Questions/Answers 2018

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     On Sunday, January, 07, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0001.  Dr. Marshall’s Grant

01. Project Overview:

     My five minute “Research Begins” video shows the problem.

     (The video narrative)

     In 1967, my rookie year in the Major leagues, I pitched for the Detroit Tigers. As a reliever, I had a 1.98 earned run average. I won one game and I lost three games, saved twelve games.

     Although I sometimes felt tightness in my pitching elbow, I pitched the entire season without meaningful discomfort. However after the season, I noticed that I could not bend my pitching arm up to my shoulder and I could not extend it out straight.

     I immediately went to my doctor for X-rays.

     First, let’s see why I could not fully extend my pitching elbow. How deeply the tip of the olecranon process goes into its fossa determines the extension range of motion. Compared with my glove elbow, the olecranon process in my pitching arm does not go into its process fossa as far.

     Careful measurements of my glove and pitching elbows showed that baseball pitching caused me to lose twelve degrees of my extension range of motion in my pitching elbow.

     Now, let’s see why I could not fully flex my pitching elbow. The length of the coronoid process determines the flexion range of motion of the elbow. Compared with my glove elbow, the coronoid process in my pitching elbow has lengthened considerably.

     Careful measurements of my glove and pitching elbows showed that baseball pitching also caused me to lose twelve degrees of my flexion range of motion in my pitching elbow.

     Nobody told me that baseball pitching could permanently deform my pitching arm. I was, and remain, mad as hell.

     Clearly, if I wanted to have a long major league career, I could not continue to lose flexion and extension ranges of motion in my pitching elbow. To stop this, I needed to know why this happened.

     Fortunately, in January 1965, I became the Graduate Teaching Assistant for the undergraduate Kinesiology course. When I told my Kinesiology professor, William W. Heusner about the problem, he said that I should high-speed film my pitching motion. He loaned me his sixty-four frames per second camera and suggested that I talk with the Agricultural Engineering Department about their high-speed camera. They agreed.

     Let’s take a look at what I got.

     I took this front view with Dr. Heusner’s sixty-four frames per second camera. When I threw my “traditional” slider, I slammed my olecranon process into its fossa. As a result, I lost twelve degrees of my extension range of motion.

     I took this side view with the Agricultural Engineering Department’s four hundred frames per second camera. At this point, I start the final acceleration through release. We need to watch the Triceps Brachii muscle on the back of my upper arm. See how my Triceps Brachii is not contracted. I call this, “Triceps Brachii Flop”. That my Triceps Brachii muscle never contracted proves that, to prevent my olecranon process from slamming into its fossa, I contracted my Brachialis muscle.

     The Brachialis muscle arises from the anterior surface of the lower half of the Humerus bone and inserts into the coronoid process of the Ulna bone. It flexes the elbow. With the “traditional” slider, the pull on my coronoid process caused it to lengthen and I lost twelve degrees of the flexion range of motion in my pitching elbow.

     How can I stop slamming my olecranon process into its fossa and using my Brachialis muscle?

     I found the answer in the release of my fastball. I noticed that immediately after I released my fastball I pronated my pitching forearm. See how the palm of my pitching hand faces outward? To pronate that much, I had to have started my pronation before I released the pitch.

     To determine how pronating my forearm before release, instead of after, affected my pitching elbow, I raised my pitching hand to ear height with my thumb pointing upward and I extended my pitching arm straight forward. Ow, that hurts the elbow!!!

     Next, I started with my pitching hand at ear height and my thumb upward and I pronated. I could do that as hard as I wanted and it did not bother my elbow. This experiment taught me that when baseball pitchers powerfully pronate the releases of all of their pitches, they protect their pitching elbow.

     Let’s watch me pronate the release of my 1971 Fastball. See how quickly I pronate my pitching hand after release. Wow, with my 1971 fastball, I pronated so hard that I turned the palm of my pitching hand almost upward.

     Let’s watch me pronate the release of my 1971 slider. See how quickly I pronated my pitching hand after release. Wow, with my 1971 slider, I pronated so hard that I turned the palm of my pitching hand outward. That’s what I did in 1967 with my fastball.

     Let’s watch me pronate the release of my 1971 screwball. See how quickly I pronated my pitching hand after release. Wow, with my 1971 screwball, I pronated so hard that I turned the palm of my pitching hand upward.

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     On August 14, 1866, Candy Cummings threw the first curveball. Since then, pitchers suffered pain for 152 years.

     As a Kinesiology graduate instructor, I designed a pitching motion that eliminated all injuries. By pitching in 106 games and 208 innings, I earned the 1974 Cy Young Award.

     With the Marshall Pitching Motion, even pitchers with the worst elbow injuries will be without pain. Then and forever, pitchers will throw fabulous curveballs and sliders. Now, all pitchers can be the best that they are able to be.

02. Preliminary data:

     Dr. Rick W. Wright is the only researcher to study the extension and flexion ranges of motion of the non-dominant and dominant elbows. Dr. Wright published: “The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 34, no. 2, 190-193, February 2006.”

     Thirty-three professional pitchers were evaluated for elbow range of motion during spring training preseason physical examination.

     Dominant arms decreases elbow extension by 7.9 degrees and dominant arms decreases flexion 5.5 degrees.

     Conclusion: Professional pitchers demonstrate elbow flexion and extension differences between dominant and non-dominant elbows.

     Jim Dryden, the Director of Broadcasts and Podcasts from the Washington University in St. Louis interviewed Dr. Wright said: “We could not find anything that explained why the range of motion inhibited the pitching elbow.”

     Dr. Wright did not understand why pitchers bang the olecranon process into the olecranon fossa. The answer to that question is that pitchers release their curveballs over the top of the Index finger.

     To not bang the olecranon process and olecranon fossa together, pitchers must release their curveballs and sliders under their Middle finger.

03. Project Summary:

     This study will happen only one time at the end of September 2018 and nobody knows their names.

     For best participants, we need Major League Baseball pitchers with one year of service. We need MLB pitchers of any ages and from anywhere. We need MLB pitchers that want to participate. With 30 Major League Baseball teams, we expect to treat 12-20 pitchers per team for totals between 240 and 360.

04. Data Collection:

     Orthopedic surgeons and Athletic Trainers will read the Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometers Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arms manual. (See the Marshall manual)

     The orthopedic surgeons and Athletic Trainers will measure the non-dominants and dominants extension and flexion for their ranges of motion, write their ranges of motion and collect the 3x5 cards.

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|                                               |  
|   Non-Dominant Arm       Dominant Arm         |
|                                               |
| 1. Extension ________  1. Extension ________  |
|                                               |
| 2. Flexion  _________  2. Flexion  _________  |
|                                               |
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05. Data Analysis:

     The Statistician arranges the non-dominant and dominant ranges of motion from the smallest to the largest. With the non-dominant and dominant ranges of motion complete, the Statistician makes the statistical package.

06. Dissemination of Results:

     The general managers decide whether to publish or not.

07. Sometime in September 2018, orthopedic surgeons and Athletic Trainers will measure the extension and flexion ranges of motion of the non-dominant and dominant arms. We expect 12 to 20 MLB pitchers of each MLB team.

     30 orthopedic surgeons measure the ranges of motion for one hour and receive $150,000.00.

     30 Athletic Trainers measure for the same hour and receives $75,000.00.

     For as long it takes, the Statistician receives $10,000.00.

     The 360 3x5 cards and 60 large envelops to mail to the Statistician cost $1,100.00.

     For 30 MLB teams, the Statistician will mail Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometers Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arms at a cost of $1,800.00.

Dr. Michael Grant Marshall
Associate Professor
Department of Physical Education
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan
drmikemarshall@earthlink.net


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0002.  Here is my Dr. Marshall Grant

We were wondering if you and Dr. Chambers were making any progress. This is very good.

Yes, Eric and I have viewed the “Research Begins” video a few times before as well.

It is a rare person who has both, experienced the phenomenon of olecranon process/fossa collision while pitching, AND also has the knowledge anatomy that allows him to understand WHY he has pain.

You are that person. You have imparted your anatomical knowledge to me and my sons, as well as other students you have worked with.

99.9% of pitchers who have olecranon process/fossa collision do not know what it is, why it happens, or how to prevent it. They have no anatomical knowledge of their arm.

99.9% of doctors do not understand the powerful movement of baseball pitching and it consequences. They have either never played baseball, or if they have, they did not throw breaking pitches with enough force to experience full extension under that force where their elbow seemed to “hit the doorstop.”

Or they have not experienced the reflexive Brachialis contraction that tries to stop that collision from happening. They have knowledge of anatomy, but they have no understanding of the consequences of repeatedly accelerating a baseball to release velocities of 80, 90 or 100 mph while attempting to impart curve and slider spin axis on the ball in the traditional manner.

I believe your video is the simplest and most direct way to communicate what is happening to the elbow joint when high school, college, and professional baseball pitchers are releasing their breaking pitches with a supination action of the forearm as opposed to the pronation action.

When I was in college, I can remember when I was throwing and scouts had their radar guns on me, I would “cut loose” with a very relaxed whips-like action to try to obtain my highest release velocity. After games like that, I recall the back of my elbow would be very tender and swollen.

My next start I would subconsciously try to protect the back of my elbow by contracting the brachialis to prevent the olecranon process/fossa collision. After those games, my “Biceps Brachii” would be very sore close to my elbow, or so I thought. I was unaware that I was contracting my Brachialis. I had no knowledge of anatomy at the time.

I did not know that I was in relentless cycle of injuring and subsequently trying to protect my elbow every time I pitched. It wasn’t until Eric and I started working with you that it all became crystal clear and simple to understand. I hope this gets us somewhere with MLB.


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0003.  Davis: Former starter is the thinking man's closer
Denver Post
January 05, 2018

Wade Davis’ repertoire is devastatingly effective.

The Rockies’ new $52 million closer can grip it and rip it when he needs to because his 95 mph four-seam fastball generates plenty of swings and misses. His 91-93 mph cutter, with its deceptive, late-breaking action, leaves frustrated batters shaking their heads. His 83 mph breaking ball, thrown with a knuckle-curve grip, buckles knees.

All of that has made Davis one of baseball’s premier relievers. Over the past four seasons, the right-hander has an ERA of 1.45, with just nine home runs allowed and 313 strikeouts in 241 innings. Pitching for the Cubs last season, his strikeout rate of 12.1 per nine innings was the second-best of his career. That’s why the Rockies opened the vault for Davis, paying him $17.33 million annually for the next three years, the most ever for a relief pitcher.

But there are other compelling reasons why the Rockies believe the 32-year-old, three-time all-star can thrive in Colorado’s thin air. Not only is Davis tough minded, he’s also a student of pitching, always looking for an edge.

Rockies pitching coach Steve Foster, who got to know Davis when Foster was Kansas City’s pitching coordinator in 2013-14, calls Davis “a cerebral, silent assassin.”

“Wade does all of his research,” said Rockies left-hander Jake McGee, who recently signed a three-year, $27 million contract to rejoin the Rockies. “Even being out there in the bullpen, he prepares just like a starter, which is how he started out. He does his research and he studies hitters.

“He knows who to pitch around and who to go after. And, of course, his stuff’s really good, so that helps out a lot.”

McGee was a wide-eyed, 17-year-old kid when he met Davis in 2004 as teammates for the Princeton (WV) Devil Rays of the Appalachian (rookie) League. Davis, a third-round pick by Tampa Bay out of Florida’s Lake Wales High School, was just 18.

“Even back then, Wade was quiet and professional, focused,” McGee said. “We kind of pushed each other. When one of us had a good start, that made the other one work even harder.”

Davis, who’s the type of man of tends to credit others for his success, points to many former teammates as the source of his baseball education.

“I was around some pretty great minds in Tampa,” he said. “Whether it was James Shields or Matt Garza, I learned plenty of stuff. I remember watching Kyle Farnsworth pitching, asking him things, having him point things out. So, I was around a lot of good minds and I think that leads you in the right direction. You learn a little bit about hitters and that helps you find a couple of go-tos when you need them.”

Davis, came out high school wanting to be a major-league starter. But as his career advanced, the results were less than impressive. So the Rays ended up trying him as both a reliever and a starter.

“I didn’t really get to make any of those choices, actually,” Davis said. “It was, ‘Hey, go do this, and you really don’t have any choice.”

In December 2012, Tampa Bay traded him to Kansas City. He pitched in 31 games for the Royals in 2013, 24 of which were starts. The results were not good: a 5.32 ERA, lower average velocity, and 58 walks and 15 home runs allowed in just 135 innings. The following season, when set-up man Luke Hochevar needed Tommy John surgery, the Royals converted Davis into a full-time reliever. It was a turning point.

Utilizing his starter’s knowledge, combined with a new role that allowed him to cut loose, Davis blossomed. For the 2014-15 seasons, Davis posted a 0.97 ERA in 140 games and helped lead the Royals to two World Series, and one world title. It was the first time in major-league history that a reliever who logged more than 100 innings across two seasons posted an ERA under 1.00. As a reliever, Davis’ fastball heated up, and his curveball and cutter made him nearly invincible.

His work in the 2015 playoffs was a masterpiece, concluding with a K.C.’s World Series victory over the Mets in five games. Davis appeared in eight of the Royals 11 playoff wins, not allowing a run over 10 innings. He pitched more than one inning three times, and struck out 18 batters while walking only three.

Davis’ reputation as a late-game enforcer was cast that October.

“(He’s) a guy who’s taken very seriously when he comes into the game,” Rockies general manager Jeff Bridich said. “If you’re the opposition and you see Wade Davis coming in, just like Greg Holland and other top closers, those guys are taken seriously. The other team knows that they have it in for them to try to win that game that night.

“It’s a big thing for a team with playoff aspirations, and hopefully it’s a good thing for the organization for a number of years with Wade.”

But it’s not just pitching acumen that convinced the Rockies to invest so much faith and money in Davis, it was also his toughness and resilience. In the Cubs’ 9-8 victory over Washington in Game 5 of the National League Division Series last fall,  Davis finished the game with a seven-out save — the first seven-out save of his career.

Yes, Davis allowed a run, two hits and two walks, but he worked a 1-2-3 ninth inning against the top of the Nationals lineup to preserve the series. And he struck out slugger Bryce Harper to finish the job.

“I was sitting there watching the game with my wife, and I remember thinking, ‘This is just like in Kansas City,’ ” Foster said. “He comes to the mound and teams know that chances are, the game is over.”


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     The article does not tell us what pitches Mr. Davis throws. If he releases his curveball over the top of the Index finger, then Mr. Davis will has elbow pain.

To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0004.  Orioles know Harvey could test their plans to be cautious with him in 2018
Baltimore Sun
January 09, 2018

An offseason away from it all hasn't done much to change Orioles manager Buck Showalter's thinking on right-hander Hunter Harvey, who — were it not for three years of injuries — could reasonably be in his rotation by now.

Looking Monday at a roster board bereft of starting pitching and knowing the talent the team's 2013 first-round draft pick both had before years of elbow trouble and still carried in his rehabilitation outings last summer, Showalter said it would be the Orioles, and not Harvey, who are the ones who will need to be cautious this year.

Even with Harvey having pitched just 31 1/3 innings over the past three seasons, which were sunk by a fractured leg, sports hernia surgery and Tommy John elbow reconstruction, there's little doubt among the Orioles brass that he could be among their best pitchers in major league camp this year and force a decision that's equal parts uncomfortable and enticing, at least for the 2018 club.

"Let's put it this way — if he didn't have options, he may not go down," Showalter said Monday at the club's annual pitching minicamp. "I think he'd be capable of handling that. But I think in a perfect world, I don't know if we're going to have that luxury of carrying someone like that in the bullpen. It's not in his best interest to be in the bullpen if you can help it. But we'll see how it progresses.

I'm not coming in with any binders on him. He's a pitcher. He's a normal, regular pitcher in the spring, and we're going to treat him as such. He's over it.

"I know Hunter was probably as happy a guy to just be here as a normal pitcher. He's ready to go. If anything, we're going to have to caution ourselves with him."

That much, at least, was true Monday. Harvey, fresh off his November addition to the 40-man roster and a recent trip to the MLB Rookie Career Development Program, came to Sarasota from an offseason he was relieved to call a healthy one. Instead of having to follow a strict rehab schedule, he hunted. He's been throwing for about a month, and for the first time in years can say he does so without pain. And that's big enough for him to not worry about the big picture within the organization.

"I haven't really gotten that far yet, I don't think," Harvey said. "Just not being able to pitch the last couple years, it hasn't been on my mind much. My mindset is let's get healthy, let's start feeling good. I'll take the ball every five days and we'll go from there. I just haven't gotten that far ahead.

"Wherever I'm at, I just want to be able to take the ball every five, six days, be healthy, pitch a full season and just have a normal year.”

For Showalter and the entire Orioles organization, the main goal is the same.

"Healthy," Showalter said. "I don't have much doubt he'll be productive if he's healthy. I think he's got the worst behind him."

A similar situation, albeit with one extenuating circumstance, played out two minicamps ago with another Orioles first-round pick who ended up spending his season in Sarasota rehabbing instead of climbing through the minors: Dylan Bundy. In 2016, Bundy was out of minor league options thanks to the big league deal he signed as the fourth overall pick in the 2011 draft, and needed to stick on the major league roster despite pitching just 63 1/3 innings over three years that included Tommy John surgery.

Harvey's locker at minicamp that year was right next to Bundy's, and the two have developed and maintained a friendship since Harvey was drafted in 2013 in part because of the time they've spent rehabbing in Sarasota.

The Orioles didn't have a choice but to pitch Bundy at the major league level with scant Double-A experience at age 23 in 2016, or risk losing him on waivers. So he pitched the first half of the season out of the bullpen, then started in the second half and all of 2017. He's had to develop on the fly at the highest level, learning the rigors of a long season in the rotation without innings limits and while adding pitches such as his slider into the mix on the fly.

Considering all that, his 4.16 ERA over the past two seasons hints at a strong career ahead of him. The only caveat to any of it was the disparity in his performance on four days’ rest versus anything else, with his ERA at 4.68 on regular rest and 3.88 with an extra day or more in 2017.

The whole process, however, flew in the face of convention, both on a Tommy John front in the sense that Bundy threw 109 2/3 and 169 2/3 innings in consecutive seasons after such inactivity, and on a player development front in the sense that he was forced to pitch at the major league level so quickly.

If Harvey spends meaningful time in the majors this season, such prescriptions will likely once again be challenged. Showalter was happy to flout the norms as Bundy developed into a major league pitcher before his eyes.

To do it again wouldn't be too much of a stretch — especially if Harvey showcases the up-to-97-mph fastball and the deep, sharp curveball that he displayed in his final rehab start last season for Low-A Delmarva. Baseball America rated him the club's fourth-best prospect this offseason despite his inactivity, and some in the organization still have him atop their lists.

So even as Showalter reminds himself and the coaching staff of the self-control that will be required while they watch Harvey work in the spring, his defense of their plan with Bundy and his hope for Harvey's future won't be far from the tip of his tongue.

"I think it's been shown that some of these false parameters of Tommy John-surgery guys, I think you take each case as it comes," Showalter said. "I'm hoping that we get to the point in spring that we think it's going to be sooner than later. But I think we'll have a pretty good feel for where he is in spring. He'll get some innings here."


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0005.  Cardinals fans still paying the price for regrettable Leake contract
Belleville News-Democrat
January 10, 2018

The word is that the St. Louis Cardinals don’t want to sign any pitchers to a contract longer than two years — and preferably one — because of the bad experience the team had with the Mike Leake deal.

The Redbirds had to eat a significant portion of the five-year pact in excess of $80 million that the team lavished on Leake a couple of winters ago to get the Seattle Mariners to take the hurler off their hands. But what I don’t get is why that is the fault of the length of the deal.

Usually, teams are reluctant to pay a pitcher for five years because they fear he’ll either get hurt, age poorly or suffer from a decline in effectiveness. But they got exactly what they should have expected in Leake. He didn’t get worse, they just overreacted to missing out on trying to sign then-free agent lefty David Price and made an impulsive offer.

Leake’s ERA and walks and hits per innings pitched ratio weren’t far off his career marks during his time in St. Louis. He is a mediocre hurler who was dramatically overpaid to produce mediocre results.

If it’s true that the Birds don’t plan on passing out longer than two-year contracts for starting pitchers, I hope this crop of young hurlers we’ve heard so much about over the past year or two pans out. Because they’re never going to get an above-average free-agent starter for that short of a term. The market very rarely works that way when top talent is concerned.

The Cardinals don’t need to win a bidding war for Jake Arrieta or Yu Darvish. But it would make all the sense in the world to bring back durable and effective hurler Lance Lynn, who has expressed a desire to stick with the only professional franchise he’s known. Lynn will probably cost between a third and a half of the total dollars the previously mentioned free agents command. But he’ll be 85 percent effective. The problem is, how do you convince Lynn he’s worth two years and $30 million when you gave a guy who isn’t half the pitcher he is two and a half times that much money?

With an aging Adam Wainwright, a fragile Michael Wacha and other question marks in the rotation, it would be nice to have a guy like Lynn that you could count on to pitch every fifth day. He’s a guy that the Cardinals should have been pursuing before now instead of playing games trying to pretend they’re in the hunt for Manny Machado, Josh Donaldson or Arrieta.

The Birds have several young pitchers the leadership of the organization believes have a chance to be significant contributors. But it’s naive to think they’re all going to pan out.

We’ve seen cases like that of Alex Reyes who blew out his elbow on the eve of his rookie campaign, Anthony Reyes who never lived up to hype — at one point he was rated higher as a prospect than Wainwright — and everything in between. All the kids can’t be counted on to make the final step in their development. Even if they can, it would be nice to have a veteran presence on the staff to be their leader. Wainwright is on his way out the door while Carlos Martinez has his hands full working on reaching his own massive potential.

The party line coming out of Busch Stadium is that the Cardinals are increasingly satisfied with the roster as it stands. But I don’t see it. If the team doesn’t like the players available to them, say so. But don’t come up with some artificial standards to exclude anyone who could help this team. Saying that they won’t pay a starting pitcher in a contract longer than two seasons excludes anyone except rehab projects and guys on their last legs. Those players aren’t going to help this team improve enough to compete for a division title.


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0006.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

Did I lean enough on this pitch with the heavy ball?

I'm trying to get better at leaning.

What are your thoughts?


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     The photo shows you in the final movement of releasing the heavy ball.

     Your pitching foot is barely off the ground.

     When the heel of your glove foot touches the ground, the bent knee of your pitching leg should be in front of your body.

     When the heel of your glove foot pulls backward, you start of the rotations of your hips and shoulders and your pitching arm is horizontal pointing at second base and does not become vertical until you are aiming down the acromial line.

     When pitchers apply force forward, you cannot generate total power.

     Like Samson reached toward the two center pillars, you need to apply your glove arm toward second base and apply the pitching arm toward home plate.

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0007.  How Dr. Mike Marshall entered the Grant

     At January 13, 2018, I entered the Goin' Postal on 38439 5th Avenue in Zephyrhills, FL 33439.

     At 9:14 AM, the clerk took $41.22 for Standard Overnight.

     The Recipient's name is John D' Angelo, the Senior Director, League Econmics and Strategy Major League Baseball.

     Mr. D' Angelo works at 34th Floor on 245 Park Avenue in New York, NY 10167 with telephone number 212.931.7832.

     The Receipt is #36739.

     Invoice is 30668901.

     The clerk said that the package would arrive at 3:00 PM on Tuesday, January 16, 2018, one day after my birthday, but on Martin Luther King Jr's day.

     The clerk said that they would tell us when the package arrived.

     Now, I have to wait for the 12 injury experts to tell me whether I get the Grant or not.

     When I learn the result, I will tell those that shared my work.


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0008.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

I really like that cue of pushing the two pillars apart. Sticking hand and pronation snap in the strike zone while pulling back glove arm towards second base applying force in opposite directions.

Doing this, I can feel it moving my mass forward more.

It helps me especially drive the sinker down my acromial line.

I want to be able to throw the sinker for a strike in any count at any time.


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     All power is between the opposite forces.

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     On Sunday, January, 14, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0009.  Pitching knee

In Q# 6 you answered: “When the heel of your glove foot touches the ground, the bent knee of your pitching leg should be in front of your body.”

Could you expand on this because it seems like an impossible teach.

You want no push off with the pitching foot off the mound.

You’ve often said that the heal of the glove foot landing starts the walking reflex.

So I can’t see any scenario where you could possibly have the pitching knee ahead of your body when the heel of the glove foot lands.

What am I missing?


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     What you are missing is that you are thinking about the foot actions and leaving the arm actions behind.

     The first movement in the walking action is lifting the Rear foot.

     The second movement in the walking action is when the heel of the Front foot touches the ground.

     The third movement in the walking action is pulling the hips and shoulders forward.

     If pitchers used the Rear foot to push backward, the Front foot could not generate any forward force.

     As I wrote: Like Samson reached toward the two center pillars, you need to apply your glove arm toward second base and apply the Pitching arm toward home plate.

     Without the power between the opposite forces, the Front foot cannot move the bent knee diagonally down the acromial line.

     The walking action and the Glove arm moves toward second base and the Pitching arm move toward home.

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0010.  Dr. Mike Marshall's Grant.

     Mr. D' Angelo works for Major League Baseball on the 34th Floor at 245 Park Avenue in New York, NY 10167.

     D. McPhearson signed for the delivery.

     Dr. Mike Marshall's Grant arrived on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at 11:43am.

     Now, I have to wait until the 12 injury experts decide whether I will receive the Grant.


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0011.  Tilt

You write about pitchers having to tilt late.

I show a picture of my college pitcher who I feel does a good job of turning his Humerus to face home plate (engaging his Latissimus Dorsi) but...

1. Does he tilt too much to get back of Humerus facing home plate?

2. Does he tilt too early.


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     This pitcher is bending forward.

     My pitchers must rotate the hips and shoulders vertical leaning forward.

     To get power, my pitchers have to move the glove arm side at second base and move the pitching arm side at home plate down the acromial line.

     The pronation snap at release is when my pitchers tilt.

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0012.  Tilt

Your pitchers have to turn the back of their Humerus bone toward home plate well before they Pronation snap.

Pitchers Pronation snap after they have extended their elbow.

Therefore, are you saying that your pitchers can turn the back of their Humerus bone toward home plate (engage their Latissimus Dorsi) without tilting to the glove side).


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     The Pectoralis Major moves the upper arm forward.

     The Latissimus Dorsi moves the upper arm upward.

     The 'horizontal rebound' stretches the tendon of Latissimus Dorsi II outward.

     When the 'horizontal rebound' recoils, the Triceps Brachii muscle enables pitchers to reach their forearm as high as they are able.

     The reach is the 'tilt.'

     The Pronator Teres pronates the forearm and the 'pronation snap' recoils at the end of the acromial line.

     To maximize the force, the glove arm side moves toward second base followed by the pitching arm side moves toward the strike zone.

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     On Sunday, January, 21, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0013.  Injury expert sports huge following
Indianapolis Business Journal
January 12, 2018

Calling Will Carroll unconventional is an understatement.

Despite having no professional medical background, the Greenwood resident has become one of the top media experts nationally focused on sports injuries.

Without any formal journalism or broadcast training, Carroll’s voice can be heard on more than 25 radio shows weekly—commenting on a variety of injury-related sports news, from sprained ankles and banged-up shoulders to head trauma and concussions. He’s also written widely on the subject, including two books.

In recent years, either Carroll or his work has been cited on ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Bleacher Report, The New York Times and New York Post, among others. He’s a regular guest on almost every local sports-talk radio show and appears on local TV newscasts.

For much of that work he’s been paid, but he does some media appearances simply to promote his reports and to raise a flag on a topic—sports injuries—he thinks is important and often overlooked.

“If it’s more than a stubbed toe I’m reporting on, Will is my first call,” said Chris Hagan, WXIN-TV Channel 59 sports director. “Every time I’ve gotten information from him, he’s been spot-on. His credibility is an A+.”

The ongoing saga over Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck’s shoulder injury has put Carroll in the spotlight locally, and injuries to the likes of Green Bay Packers All-Pro quarterback Aaron Rodgers and the ongoing concussion conversation in the NFL and other sports has given him national exposure.

Carroll is “known on a national scale,” Hagan said. And not just by journalists, who love his ability to translate medical jargon into information the average sports fan can understand.

“There are high-ranking people in every Major League Baseball team front office who know who Will Carroll is,” said Greg Rakestraw, a veteran local sports-talk radio host and current operations manager for Indianapolis-based Emmis Communications Corp.’s Network Indiana.

So who is Will Carroll?

That insight is difficult to get from the man himself. As much as he loves talking about his craft and will happily wax poetic about sports injuries, statistics, fantasy sports and baseball, he doesn’t like to talk about himself.

He isn’t fond of discussing his service in the U.S. Navy or about his time studying at Texas A&M University. Carroll will tell you he played multiple sports growing up, but insists, “I wasn’t any good.”

Rakestraw said that’s not exactly true. “He was a very good baseball player.”

This much is known about Carroll: He was born in Indianapolis and said he was one of the first people inside Market Square Arena at age 4. He spent most of his formative years in the Southeast and Texas, where his dad had multiple jobs. He has lived in central Indiana, home of his paternal grandmother, the last 20 years—and has no intention of moving.

“I don’t need to be in a certain place to do my job. And if I need to be someplace else, there is an airport here,” Carroll said. “I’ve lived a lot of places, but there’s nowhere I’d rather be. Indianapolis is a great city. I love it here.”

One other thing about Carroll: He didn’t follow a traditional path into the journalism and broadcast universe, where he has thrived.

“I never worked a beat. I didn’t come up through a newsroom mailroom,” Carroll told IBJ. “I just stumbled upward.”

Road less traveled

Twenty years ago, while working for an Indianapolis insurance company, Carroll—whose dad is a sports-science professor and worked in the 1970s as the trainer of the Indianapolis Racers professional hockey team—realized no journalist was covering sports injuries with much depth.

So he put together his first injury report—focused mostly on baseball—and distributed it to a handful of friends. He also mailed a copy to Baseball America, a publication well-known among baseball aficionados.

The summary of injuries and a breakdown for each player that included rehabilitation details and projections for both time off the field based on past cases and the long-term effect on the player’s performance were meant to be comprehensive but easy to understand.

Carroll composed a few more of his injury reports. Then one day, he heard well-known ESPN baseball expert Peter Gammons reference his report on Tony Kornhizer’s radio show.

“I about drove into a telephone pole,” Carroll said.

In relatively quick succession, the email list of those receiving Carroll’s reports grew from a couple hundred to a few thousand. He quit his day job and, in 2003, joined Baseball Prospectus, an organization that publishes a website devoted to a statistical method of baseball analysis known as Sabermetrics.

“When he did baseball, he was well-respected,” said Randy Lewandowski, president of the Indianapolis Indians, a AAA affiliate of MLB’s Pittsburgh Pirates. “He made a name for himself working with Sabermetrics and player data.”

Carroll served as an injury expert for Baseball Prospectus and wrote a regular “Under the Knife” column and periodic “Team Health Reports.” He started doing regular radio appearances.

He later served as an injury expert on ESPN’s “The Fantasy Show,” was an NFL injury expert for Sports Illustrated, and in 2013 began a two-year stint as Bleacher Report’s lead writer for sports injuries. He was one of the hosts of “Bleacher Report Radio” on SiriusXM Satellite Radio and made appearances on “CBS Sports Network” and other broadcast programs.

Carroll is amused by his own success.

“I was like the dog that runs up a tree,” he said. “I was too stupid to know I couldn’t. I went straight in and became a national writer.”

Along the way, he penned two books: “Saving the Pitcher: Preventing Pitcher Injuries in Modern Baseball,” published in 2004, and “Juice: The Real Story of Baseball’s Drug Problems,” published in 2006.

Shortly after Carroll’s first book was released, ESPN’s Gammons said: “Will Carroll has invaluable inside medical information you cannot get anywhere else.”

And Tom House—a former Major League Baseball player, adviser to the American Sports Medicine Institute and founder of the National Pitching Association—called Carroll’s first book “a must-read.”

Carroll has since moved beyond just baseball, becoming a self-taught expert on a variety of injuries in sports ranging from soccer and hockey to more mainstream stick-and-ball sports.

This year, Carroll joined New York-based Motus Global, a company specializing in wearable technology that provides biomedical analysis for athletes. He described his current position as that of “evangelist.” He continues doing radio and TV appearances as a sports-injury expert and hosts a weekly 30-minute podcast for Motus focused on the future of sports science, medicine and technology.

Critical analysis

Carroll isn’t shy about criticizing leagues’ and teams’ handling of injured players. He said the NFL isn’t doing nearly enough to research concussions. “There’s so much more they could be doing, they should be doing, and they’re not. They should be throwing money at this issue.”

Carroll also said the NFL is doing little to stop the spate of shoulder injuries that have plagued the league in recent years. Shoulder injuries this year alone have sidelined not only Luck and Green Bay’s Rodgers, but also up-and-coming New England wide receiver Chris Hogan.

“The NFL is losing some of its biggest stars because big people fell on them. It’s unbelievable,” Carroll said. “Today’s shoulder pads do nothing to protect against that. And unless Tony Stark lends an Iron Man suit to someone, nothing is being developed to address the issue.”

Carroll also hasn’t shied away from taking the hometown Colts to task. Based on an “adjusted games lost” statistic kept by Football Outsider, an independent website tracking a variety of statistics, Carroll said the Colts have not fared well in keeping players healthy and on the field.

Football Outsider ranks each of the 32 NFL teams on how much time their players miss due to injury, a calculation that is weighted for starters. The Colts have been in the bottom half of that category in recent years.

“I go by the data,” Carroll said. “For me … it’s about the results, and the Colts’ results stink.”

Carroll thinks Colts owner Jim Irsay needs to invest more in sports science. “Why wouldn’t Jim Irsay spend as much on sports science staff as he’s going to on his next guitar?”

Speaking this year on WNDE-AM 1260’s “Query & Schultz Show,” Carroll said the Colts’ training facilities are inferior not only to a number of NFL teams, but also to those of many colleges.

Colts Chief Operating Officer Pete Ward said he’s not familiar with Carroll’s work, and neither are the team’s trainers. League of his own.

As Carroll, 47, has become better known, his work has attracted criticism. He admitted that executives in the super-secretive world of sports haven’t always been thrilled with his reports.

“The thing I always get is that, ‘You’re not a doctor.’ I never said I was a doctor,” Carroll said. “Offering information and translation is what I do. My job is to explain what an injury is and how specifically it affects athletes. You can’t just say Peyton Manning has a C5, C6 fusion and he’ll be back in six weeks. I take medical talk and put it in terms sports fans can understand.”

And few do it better than Carroll, said longtime local sports columnist Bob Kravitz. In fact, few do it at all. “When you want to get sports-injury news or information, there are two guys you turn to,” said Kravitz, who writes and does on-air sports coverage for WTHR-TV Channel 13. “Will Carroll and Dr. David Chao.”

It’s pretty amazing that Carroll is mentioned in the same sentence as Chao, a former NFL head team doctor for more than 17 years and a practicing orthopedic surgeon.

“Will has got to be the most knowledgeable non-medical person I’ve ever heard discuss sports injuries,” Kravitz said. “He’s extremely well-connected and knows his stuff. He’s created his own niche.”

And not being a medical professional might be an advantage.

“Since Will isn’t a practicing clinician, he has more free-wheeling space,” said Ralph Reiff, executive director of St. Vincent Sports Performance. “There are certain things I can’t talk about as a licensed trainer.”

That doesn’t mean Carroll is free-wheeling with facts.

“Will doesn’t try to say, ‘I’m on this side or that side.’ He’s very fact-driven,” Reiff said. “I have a real appreciation for what Will is doing. He’s helping advance our profession and the transparency of our industry.”

And Reiff said he’s not alone in his admiration.

“He’s well-respected by those that matter in this industry,” he said. “That’s helped him get access to the information needed to do his job.”


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0014.  Too much of a good thing? Mayo Clinic hosts summit on sports injuries
Postbulletin.com
January 16, 2018

On Saturday, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine hosted its first-ever Baseball & Softball Summit. About 100 physicians, trainers, physical therapists and coaches attended in person or joined via webcast for a daylong discussion of a wide range of topics.

Dr. David B. Soma, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician who specializes in sports medicine, and Chad E. Cherney, a physical therapist for Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine, were two of the presenters.

On Friday, they gave the PB a sneak peak at the topics of Little League throwing injuries and the risks of early specialization in a single sport.

PB: How common are throwing-related injuries among youth baseball players?

Soma: Really, it's hard to get an exact number. What we do know is that among pitchers and catchers, probably the most common injuries that we encounter are shoulder and elbow pain. Some of the evidence seems to indicate that severe injuries, things that require surgery, seem to be on the rise. The reason for that is hard to know. Is it increasing pitch counts? Is it sports specialization? Is it that athletes are training harder? It's really hard to say.

PB: Is early specialization in baseball resulting in an increase in serious arm injuries?

Cherney: I don't know if there's a direct correlation established yet, but when you start looking at overuse injuries, what generally causes the injury is a change in the mechanics of the throw due to fatigue or discomfort. There is some interesting work being done, looking at what is the number of pitches that should be thrown per game and per season, and how much rest time is needed in a calendar year, looking at the risk of over-use and how the repetitive wear and tear on the shoulder, the elbow and the body in general can lead to increased risk of injury.

PB: When we think of baseball players developing shoulder and elbow problems, we think of pitchers, but are catchers at risk as well?

Soma: I've worked with quite a few catchers who have come in with injuries. They're kind of removed from the pitch counts and tracking. Sometimes they'll catch all five games of a weekend tournament, maybe more, so that's a really large volume of throws. Plus, their mechanics can be a problem. Some catchers don't even get off their knees to throw, so they're just using their arm to make the throw. So, while catchers probably aren't at as much risk as pitchers, it's still something to watch out for.

PB: You mentioned the pitch-count restrictions that are common throughout youth baseball now. Are they helping to protect young arms?

Soma: I think so, but it's not a perfect system. The problem is that a lot of times, kids go from fall ball, to winter ball, to spring ball to summer ball. Those pitch counts aren't being tracked from season to season, and sometimes kids are even playing in two leagues at the same time. So it's important as a baseball coach or an athletic trainer that you look for other signs that a pitcher should stop throwing, other than just looking at the pitch count. When a pitcher gets fatigued, they'll drop the elbow or show other changes in their mechanics. When there's a drop in velocity or a change in throwing mechanics, that's a sign that you need to get them a break, regardless of what the pitch count says.

PB: Why are kids playing so much more baseball today than they were 20 or 30 years ago?

Cherney: The trend is that athletes and families, and coaches to some extent, want specialization. They feel that by doing so, they'll acquire a skill set that is more beneficial down the road. Often, the thinking is "I'm going to earn a college scholarship, I'm going to make my way to the professional ranks." But only 1 to 2 percent of high school athletes will earn a college scholarship. And of those who are playing college sports on scholarship, it's a quarter- to a half-percent that will make it to the professional level.

PB: What, other than injury, is the biggest risk of early specialization in one sport?

Cherney: The burnout effect is probably the No. 1 cause of youth stopping participation. There are a number of papers that have looked at skill acquisition in elite-level players. Those who started a bit later, or did not become specialized as early, are more likely to stay with the sport longer. Those who specialize early do suffer a much higher burnout risk. PB: So, if a young athlete -- say a pitcher or catcher -- has decided to focus exclusively on baseball, what steps can they take to reduce the risk of injury?

Soma: It's really important to build in the rest and recovery. There are some good position statements from sports medicine societies that recommend taking at least one day off per week from any sport. They also recommend taking at least two months off per year from doing that specific task, like throwing. And finally, young athletes shouldn't do more hours per week of a single sport than their age. So, if you're a 13-year-old baseball player, you shouldn't play more than 13 hours of baseball per week or you'll be potentially at risk for an overuse injury.

PB: There's a common belief that breaking pitches are harder on the shoulder and elbow than the fastball. Is that true?

Soma: One pitch isn't necessarily higher risk than another. Some studies have shown that a fastball puts the most torque across the elbow because it's thrown harder, but also, some studies seem to indicate that once a pitcher starts throwing curveballs, he's more susceptible to injury. But really, the most important thing is proper mechanics, regardless of what pitch you're throwing. If you aren't using proper mechanics to throw a fastball, then you shouldn't be learning new pitches.

PB: What role are coaches playing in the push for early specialization?

Cherney: There's high coaching pressure, even if it's not verbalized pressure. If you want to be the starting quarterback or the starting running back, and the coach says "I want you at these camps," then you're going to do what the coach wants you to do. When a coach has a very good athlete that will help them be successful as a coach, then there is some pressure on the athletes to specialize.

When athletes fill out surveys as to why they specialized, the top four influences are coaches, parents, peers and the media.

PB: Is there any push-back against the trend toward early specialization?

Cherney: Urban Meyer, the head football coach at Ohio State University, has said that he's looking for multi-sport athletes. He doesn't want players who specialized in football. And, if you look at the 2017 NFL Draft, 30 of the 32 athletes who were selected in the first round were multi-sport athletes.

We now know that football and baseball are late-acquisition sports. You can still become a very good baseball player even if you specialize in it relatively late. And today, college coaches want athletes. When they are looking for players, they've created a position for the athlete, the person who can be molded into whatever they need him or her to be as a player.

PB: If you coach youth baseball, or are the parent of a youth baseball player, what should you be doing right now to reduce the risk of a player suffering an injury?

Soma: Kids need to properly warm up and stretch out before they pitch -- but the problem is, after they pitch, these guys, who are often the best players on the team, go out to play shortstop or some other position where they'll make a lot of throws. Too often, people will rely on pain medications to push kids through to the next event, but coaches and parents need to be listening to the kids' bodies, rather than simply masking the pain with ibuprofen.


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0015.  Leger explains decision to sit out season
Daily Advertiser
January 22, 2018

The decision has been contemplated for quite some time, and now it’s finalized.

Pitcher Gunner Leger, ace of the nationally ranked UL baseball team staff, will redshirt in 2018 with plans to play again for the Ragin’ Cajuns in 2019 after having a partial ligament tear in his throwing elbow repaired and undergoing offseason surgery as well to remove a bone cyst in his leg.

The reason for redshirting, Leger told The Daily Advertiser, is simple: It’s all a matter of timing.

“It was important to me and my family, and Coach Robe (Tony Robichaux) especially, that I come back and can contribute in the manner that I have in the past — throwing a hundred innings, coming out and being six, seven innings strong every weekend,” said Leger, who turned down a chance to go pro despite the Miami Marlins — which selected him in the 26th round of last June’s Major League Baseball Draft — offering him sixth-round money.

The timetable for Leger’s rehab is such that he probably wouldn’t be ready to pitch at full strength and for usual duration until very late this season, which for the Ragin’ Cajuns — ranked No. 18 by Collegiate Baseball — starts with a three-game series at Texas that opens on Feb. 16.

Robichaux said Leger — a senior from Barbe High in Lake Charles, and the Sun Belt Conference’s 2017 Pitcher of the Year — wants “to be able to take a mound at the beginning of the season and log in a hundred innings and try to pitch his team somewhere.”

“If you look at his mentality, to kind of understand where he comes from, he wants to play at a very, very high level,” Robichaux said. “Out of all the players I’ve coached in my 30 years, he’s one of the top three or four that demands so much out of himself, and so much perfection, and so much accountability.”

But Robichaux added that “with the two surgeries he had, realistically I think it puts him to the back end of the season.” And that’s with no setbacks.

Leger, a second-team Collegiate Baseball 2018 preseason All-American based off of what he did last year, had his arm repaired July 13.

The lefty had a partial ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tear, but didn’t need full-blown Tommy John reconstructive surgery, as might have been the case in years gone by.

Instead, Dr. Jeffrey Dugas — a protégé of famed Dr. James Andrews at the Andrews Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center in Birmingham, Alabama — executed a Tommy John repair procedure in which collagen-coated tape is directly attached to the UCL to anchor the ligament and help the healing process.“I didn’t have a full tear,” Leger said. “But it was obviously a significant tear. It bothered me.

During the procedure, he added, “They lay a collagen filament, a collagen string, over it. They literally wrap the ligament, kind of like you would tie a piece of meat you were about to cook.”

Unable to throw during early recovery, Leger also underwent surgery Oct. 23 to remove a cyst in his femur bone that had been lingering since high school and had not calcified.

He initially put off a procedure that would have involved a canal through the femur and a bone graft, which would have resulted in a yearlong recovery and essentially having to relearn how to walk.

“It’s a big, big deal,” he said of that option, “so that’s why we were so hesitant through all these years.”

But after learning via biopsy that the lesion didn’t appear cancerous, wasn’t bone disease-related and was merely a cyst — best-case scenario — Leger opted for a surgery that would both cut rehab time and strengthen the femur.

His Houston-based orthopedic surgeon/musculoskeletal oncologist, Dr. Rex Marco, inserted a rod into the bone after the cyst was removed — an idea Leger himself had a hand in suggesting as other options were bandied about.

The 11-inch cyst ran vertically through the femur in his left leg, from the hip area down toward his knee.

The surgery was successful, but it did set back a bit what was going to be a six- to eight-month return process anyway — making the call to redshirt this season that much more sensible.

That decision, according to Leger, was “tough in the fact that obviously I want to be out there.”

“I’ve never really been hurt,” he said. “I just like to compete, and I want to be able to contribute. It’s tough to just sit here and remain idle.

“But it was very easy, very clear, as far as what the right decision was, not the emotional decision.”

Leger, his parents and Robichaux met and devised their plan.

Leger waited to make it official, though, until he was certain of it.

As time passed, it became more and more obvious he was.

“I would miss the majority of the season,” Leger said, “so it just became the clear choice to do that — for us, and for me. Just let me get back completely healthy.

“It was important for me to be 100 percent, to be able to do the same things I’ve done here … to be able to completely contribute like I have.”

Leger was Sun Belt Freshman of the Year and a Louisville Slugger and Perfect Game Freshman All-American in 2015, when he was 6-5 with a 2.99 ERA over 114.1 innings for an NCAA Super Regional team.

In 2016 he was 7-3 with a 2.26 ERA over 91.2 innings, including four 7.0-inning outings for a Regional team.

And last year the semifinalist for the prestigious Golden Spikes Award was 10-2 with a 1.97 ERA — 19th-best nationally — over 91.1 innings.

After “three great years,” Robichaux said, “now I think he has a right to heal himself up properly and get himself ready to come back out and pitch at a high level.”

Throwing everything he has into it is precisely what Leger planned to do when he opted to stay at UL.

He had put out word to major-league teams that he wouldn’t sign after his junior season unless he went in the draft’s top five rounds or received top-five-rounds money.

So when Miami took him anyway, chancing that Leger might change his mind, he simply told the Marlins thanks, but no thanks. But Robichaux wasn’t sure what Leger was going to do when, while sitting in a restaurant with his wife, his phone rang.

“Like normal, I told Colleen, ‘This is it. I’m gonna hear what I normally hear — ‘Appreciate everything, but I’m gonna go on and play professional baseball,’” he said.

“But his call was different. When I got on the phone with him,” added Robichaux, who has taken the Cajuns to 12 NCAA Regionals, four Super Regionals and the 2000 College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, “he said, ‘Coach I just want to let you know I’m not going. I’m gonna stay.’ And he said, ‘I want to pitch you and this team, this university, back to Omaha, and try to give you something that’s the only thing that you lack, and that’s a national championship.’ ”

Leger did get draft calls as early as the seventh round, but with the money not being right, he decided to stay.

“I didn’t want to have any regrets. And this place is important to me. Really important to me,” said Leger, whose father, former St. Thomas More High, McNeese State and UL Monroe assistant football coach Tim Leger, is UL’s new receivers coach and recruiting coordinator.

Tim Leger, an Acadiana High graduate, was a fourth-round Pittsburgh Pirates draft choice who spent three seasons in the minors before playing quarterback at McNeese State in Lake Charles.

“I grew up here (in Lafayette). This is the first baseball I ever watched,” Gunner Leger said with reference to the Cajuns. “My grandfather’s had season tickets here for years. I love Coach Robe. I love our whole staff. I love our team. The city’s awesome.”

Why not stay?

“What was offered to me,” Leger said, “was not worth (losing) another year here and finishing … what I started here.”

Now, though, it will be two more years at UL if all goes as intended for Leger.

He did say he’s already had overtures about pro workouts when he’s back to fully healthy, but that by no means is what Leger is thinking about right now.

“That’s something that if it happens, it happens,” he said. “It’s not something that I’m really pushing.

“Obviously, my dream is to go and play pro ball and make it to the big leagues and all that, but right now it’s about me getting healthy and me finishing my career here.

“At the end of the day, I just want an opportunity to be able to showcase what I can do, because I feel like I belong there (playing pro ball),” he added. “And I think somebody will give me that.”

But that can wait.

Taking the time now to get his body right and not rushing anything, Robichaux suggested, is in the UL pitcher’s best interest.

“No one wants to get rid of a year of eligibility for five innings,” said Leger, who just started soft tossing about two weeks ago and still hasn’t been cleared to run.

“Some people can come back and get in 10, 15 innings, maybe, at the back end of the season, and roll out,” Robichaux added. “But I just don’t think that is what he wants to do.”


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0016.  Medlen to continue comeback with Diamondbacks, not Braves
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
January 23, 2018

Kris Medlen will continue trying to make it back to the major leagues this spring, but not with the Braves.

The popular former Braves pitcher, who returned to the team on a minor league contract last year, signed with the Diamondbacks for 2018. He got a minor league deal, but unlike the contract he signed with the Braves in late-January 2017, this one with the Diamondbacks includes an invitation to major league spring training.

Medlen, 32, will make $1.1 million if he makes Arizona’s major league roster, and he has an opt-out clause that will allow him to sign with another team if he isn’t on the 40-man roster by March 27 at the end of spring training.

He hoped to return to the Braves in 2018 after buying a home for his family in the city of Atlanta, but hadn’t heard interest from new Braves management this offseason.

Medlen came back from shoulder problems with the Royals in 2016, spent last offseason and spring training rehabbing his shoulder and working on a less-stressful pitching delivery, then 5-8 with a 4.95 ERA in 20 starts last season at three minor league levels in the Braves organization after beginning his season in late May.

He had 98 strikeouts with 30 walks in 116 1/3 innings.

“I’m just in a completely different spot than last year,” said Medlen, who came back from two Tommy John elbow surgeries with the Braves to have a promising season with Kansas City in 2015, then considered retiring after shoulder woes twice landed him on the Royals disabled list in 2016.

“I had just started working out at this time last year. Been working my tail off to get back and gained a lot of confidence the way I finished up last season in Gwinnett,” Medlen said. “I am more than ready for an opportunity with a good young team in Arizona.”

He decided against retiring after consulting with a biomechanics specialist in New Orleans who showed he could adjust his delivery to lessen the risk of injury. The Braves signed Medlen and told him not to rush things, to work at a pace that would best put him in position for a possible second-half return to the majors.

After two starts in high Single-A in May, Medlen made two at Double-A Mississippi, where he had a 1.74 ERA and seemed to be inching closer to a potential call-up with the Braves.

But after a promotion to Triple-A Gwinnett, Medlen ended up spending the rest of the season there, going 3-7 with a 5.42 ERA in 16 starts. The Braves had several young prospects they wanted to gain experience at the big-league level late in the season, and those pitchers filled out the rotation in the final weeks of the season.

Former general manager John Coppolella indicated an interest in bringing Medlen back for 2018, but Coppolella was forced to resign after the season amid a Major League Baseball investigation that led to serious penalties for the Braves and a lifetime ban from baseball for Coppolella.

Medlen, an affable southern California native, debuted in the majors with Atlanta in 2009 and went 41-25 with a 3.25 ERA in 173 games (75 starts) over parts of five seasons through 2013. He was a sensation for the Braves in 2012, going 10-1 with a 1.57 ERA in 50 games including 9-0 with a puny 0.97 ERA in 12 starts after a midseason move to the rotation.

He had his second Tommy John elbow surgery with the Braves during spring training 2014, missed that entire season and then left as a free agent, signing a two-year, $8.5 million deal with Kansas City – an indication of how highly thought of Medlen was by Royals general manager Dayton Moore, a former Braves assistant GM.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, January, 28, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0017.  Intrigued

I recently underwent surgery for a torn anterior labrum. Basically a slap tear.

Two anchors were used and according to the surgeon and my attending physo therapist, it went as well as could be expected.

Although the original injury occurred throwing a pitch - my shoulder subluxed for the first time in 2013 - it became more of a problem when I played shortstop and was forced to make throws deep in the hole. Between the mound and infield, it subluxed around 15-20 times the last six seasons.

The instability necessitated the surgery.

I usually bounced back within 2-3 weeks and resumed playing through a combination of physio and ibuprofen. I'm 46 years old and play both old timer and senior men's baseball.

I usually throw between 4-6 innings per week, plus several hundred pitches to the players I coach in bp M behind an L screen 40 ft away.

My existing mechanics, to give you a visual, are basically a carbon copy of Jack Morris, who I patterned myself after since the early eighties.

This motion has always been natural to me, and I've never experienced any lower body pain or elbow trouble which I attribute after watching your videos, to the fact that I pseudo pendulum swing in this delivery.

Like most people my age, there aren't enough hours in the week with a career, kids, volunteer work, not to mention a wife, to fully commit to your program of pronating every throw I make with a baseball.

That said, my question to you is if I switch gears once I'm able to begin throwing again, and adopt the Jeff Sparks method - which seems incredibly natural - will I benefit from truly pendulum swinging without pronating every single throw.

Do you have to be all in with your technique of pronating  - and training for that action -  for it to be beneficial?

There are so many elements in your teachings that make sense in regards to the traditional placement of the feet on the rubber and the kinetic chain in general, that I do wish to incorporate it without completely overhauling everything.

Can the latissimus dorsi be activated without pronation?

Can I still use my forkball, which is basically unhittable as an out pitch.

Thanks for all the info on the net Dr. Mike, it made the twelve weeks I had off work go by a little quicker and made me think of pitching a baseball in a totally different light.


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     When baseball pitchers have trouble, I always give 'Good information for all baseball pitchers.'

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     Watch Dr. Mike Marshall's Baseball Pitching Motion.

     Watch my Baseball Pitching Instructional Video, especially segment 11. James Jeffrey Sparks.

     The Latissimus Dorsi muscle cannot activate without pronation.

     Never, never use supination.

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0018.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

How long do I need to give myself to feel fresh to compete in the game coming out of training mode?

I have been on the 12 lbs. lead ball program throwing it 96 reps.

Spring training is right around the corner so when should I go into maintenance mode?


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     You should stop the heavy work thirty days before you arrive at Spring Training.

     Obviously pitching coaches will do what they will do.

     However, you should do into 12 repetitions for your wrist weight exercises and heavy ball throws out of the sight of coaches.

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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, February, 04, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0019.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

I've been throwing live to hitters lately and have been feeling discomfort in my elbow in the last week in and a half.

Specifically in the inside of the elbow.

I believe I had too much late forearm turnover causing a bounce.

I made the adjustment and made sure my palm was facing third base at landing.

My elbow is still very sore, but I know nothing is wrong with it.

I've also been flying out sometimes as well.

I know I'm not supinating any pitches.

I have thrown a lot this offseason.

What do I need to do to get this inflammation out of my elbow?


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     My guess is that you are trying to get more power.

     Instead of trying to get more power, you should be focus on 'pronation snap.'

     When you master the 'pronation snap,' the inflammation in your elbow will go away.

     Work on spin, not shoulder or elbow.

     I want you to 'recoil,' not power.

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0020.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

I will work on this.

I also need to stop looping.

I usually have a good pendulum swing on the way out, but then I come unlocked and return my palm down facing the ground while bringing the baseball to my ear causing a small turnover late as well as a loop.

Learning how to lock out my arm should correct this.

What are your thoughts?


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     You are rushing your body.

     The body does not move until the pitching arm is forty-five degrees behind your body.

     Then, you step forward.

     The pendulum swing moves in the straight line between second base and home plate.

     The pendulum swing moves to driveline height at the same time that the heel of the Front foot hits dirt.

     To move the upper arm from horizontal to vertical, the Pectoralis Major muscle moves the upper arm upward, then the Latissimus Dorsi I muscle moves the upper arm closer to vertical, then the Latissimus Dorsi II muscle 'horizontal rebounds' into and when the forearm moves from horizontal to vertical and the Triceps Brachii muscle reaches as high as you are able during the you are applying force down the acromial line.

     The 'pronation snap' is your focus.

     The faster the 'pronation snap,' the more movement of the baseball.

     The more spin of the baseball causes batters to miss.

     Forget about the shoulder and elbow, just spin your forearm and wrist until the palm of your pitching arm faces upward.

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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, February, 11, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0021.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

That cue is money. I feel no discomfort when I do that and I also feel like I'm force coupling my pitching arm without trying.

I report to spring training next Thursday on the 22nd.

I can leave early to Florida and stop by for a couple days to train with you if you are up for it.

No worries if you are busy or cannot.


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     You are welcome for a long as you need.

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0022.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

I plan on leaving Saturday or Sunday. I will let you know.

I've been trying to rotate my shoulders so much to where I'm showing my back to home plate and it's helped the screwball a lot.

I also throw a reverse breaking pitch with the same grip as the screw. I guess it developed from attempting to throw the sinker last season. I try to spiral it, but more towards third base.

I basically just try to throw a fastball towards third base and it spirals towards home. It gets good movement.

Is this the idea of throwing the sinker?

Also,

A while back you said looping is caused by being inpatient down the mound. I guess it's a timing issue.

How do I become better at being patient down the mound?


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     The fastball with a spiral on the top front of the baseball is the best sinker.

     The best way to be patient to take a deep breath and imagine the pitch you want to throw as you are stepping on the rubber.

     Take a look at the infield and outfield for each batter.

     Hurry, but never rush.

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0023.  Powell found motivation on road to recovery
Hattiesburg American
February 03, 2018

Walker Powell hasn’t felt as good as he does today in years.

And the slender, 6-foot-7 Southern Miss pitcher has his left leg to thank for it.

Powell missed the 2017 season after tearing the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow (which requires Tommy John surgery) for the second time in less than three years. The first time around, when he was a junior at Fayetteville (Arkansas) High, a tendon from his wrist was used to replace the damaged UCL. Powell said the only on-field action he got as a senior came at first base — since he couldn't throw — in the playoffs.

"I did hit a home run, though," he proudly declares.

But the surgically repaired elbow did not hold up and Powell found himself back on the shelf when it failed during the Conference USA tournament in 2016.

“We were playing Marshall,” he said. “I looked down in the third inning and it looked like I had a golf ball in my arm.”

This time, doctors took a different approach to repair Powell’s injured elbow.

“They basically took the ripped graft, got a new one out of my hamstring and basically weaved them together and then put it back in there,” he said. “Bottom line is my arm feels stronger now than it ever has.”

Such a statement brings about a hefty sigh of relief for Powell, who struggled to cope with a second major arm surgery so shortly after the first.

“Going through it twice sucks,” he said. “It was kind of a dark place for me. As a player, I was like, ‘Two Tommy Johns? I just want to play. I feel like I’ve been sitting in this locker room forever.’ So, yeah, it sucked. But it was also a blessing. It has motivated me to come back stronger.”

That is potentially good news for the Golden Eagles. When Powell arrived in Hattiesburg, he showed plenty of promise as a true freshman, finishing with a 4-3 record and a 3.46 earned run average. Featuring late life on his four-seam fastball, Powell also throws a two-seamer, slider, curveball and changeup.

New pitching coach Christian Ostrander remembers well the first time he saw the big right-hander.

“It was my first year at (Louisiana) Tech,” he said. “He pitched against us on Sunday, and I was like, ‘Good God! This guy’s a freshman?’ It was good stuff. He’s a strike thrower with sink and cut. It’s not necessarily the sexiest stuff, but he’s got good action from a good angle. He’s still the same type guy he was, but I think he might be a little more efficient than he was.“He could be a big factor for us, I think.”

Powell, whose second Tommy John surgery was done in July 2016, did not resume throwing until last October. And it wasn’t until December that he worked his way up to 100 percent effort off the pitcher’s mound.

As a result of his steady progress, Powell is in line to be a significant piece of Southern Miss’ starting pitching puzzle this season.

“Walker had a good fall,” said senior right-hander Colt Smith. “He’s coming back into it. We’re going to need some guys to step up and I feel like he’ll be one of them.”

Powell contends he’s fine with starting or coming out of the bullpen, so long as he can contribute.

“I feel comfortable with whoever we put out there, whether it’s Stevie (Powers), Colt, (Alex) Nelms, me, J.C. (Keys),” he said. “With me, it’s more just being anxious coming off the injury. I’m just ready to get back. But I’ve got to stay within myself and (Ostrander) does a good job of keeping me level-headed.”


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0024.  Tigers' Garcia set for Tommy John surgery
Detroit News
February 14, 2018

Right-handed pitcher Bryan Garcia, rated as the 22nd-best prospect in the Tigers organization by MLB.com, will undergo Tommy John surgery on Thursday. The 22-year-old Garcia, who was expected to start the season at Triple-A Toledo, was examined by Dr. James Andrews on Wednesday and it was determined he had a complete tear of the ulnar collateral ligament.

Typically, pitchers need between 11 and 18 months to recover from Tommy John surgery.

Garcia was initially examined by Dr. Andrews last fall and was advised to stop throwing for an extended period of time.

“We went through it last fall,” said Tigers director of player development David Littlefield said last week. “He had some discomfort, we shut him down and he went to see Dr. Andrews, who recommended a conservative treatment where he stopped throwing.”

Toward the end of September, Garcia started throwing again and felt fine. The Tigers instructed him not to throw over the winter and just focus on strength and conditioning.

“He began throwing again in January and after the first couple of bullpens felt OK,” Littlefield said. “But as he progressed and started ramping up his throwing he had some pain.”

Garcia, the all-time saves leader at University of Miami, sped through the Tigers system last season — going from Single A to Triple A, compiling a 2.13 ERA, allowing just 36 hits and two home runs in 55 innings, with 78 strikeouts. Garcia, 22, was a sixth-round pick in 2016.


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0025.  Medlen to continue comeback with Diamondbacks, not Braves
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
January 23, 2018

Kris Medlen will continue trying to make it back to the major leagues this spring, but not with the Braves.

The popular former Braves pitcher, who returned to the team on a minor league contract last year, signed with the Diamondbacks for 2018. He got a minor league deal, but unlike the contract he signed with the Braves in late-January 2017, this one with the Diamondbacks includes an invitation to major league spring training.

Medlen, 32, will make $1.1 million if he makes Arizona’s major league roster, and he has an opt-out clause that will allow him to sign with another team if he isn’t on the 40-man roster by March 27 at the end of spring training.

He hoped to return to the Braves in 2018 after buying a home for his family in the city of Atlanta, but hadn’t heard interest from new Braves management this offseason.

Medlen came back from shoulder problems with the Royals in 2016, spent last offseason and spring training rehabbing his shoulder and working on a less-stressful pitching delivery, then 5-8 with a 4.95 ERA in 20 starts last season at three minor league levels in the Braves organization after beginning his season in late May.

He had 98 strikeouts with 30 walks in 116 1/3 innings.

“I’m just in a completely different spot than last year,” said Medlen, who came back from two Tommy John elbow surgeries with the Braves to have a promising season with Kansas City in 2015, then considered retiring after shoulder woes twice landed him on the Royals disabled list in 2016.

“I had just started working out at this time last year. Been working my tail off to get back and gained a lot of confidence the way I finished up last season in Gwinnett,” Medlen said. “I am more than ready for an opportunity with a good young team in Arizona.”

He decided against retiring after consulting with a biomechanics specialist in New Orleans who showed he could adjust his delivery to lessen the risk of injury. The Braves signed Medlen and told him not to rush things, to work at a pace that would best put him in position for a possible second-half return to the majors.

After two starts in high Single-A in May, Medlen made two at Double-A Mississippi, where he had a 1.74 ERA and seemed to be inching closer to a potential call-up with the Braves.

But after a promotion to Triple-A Gwinnett, Medlen ended up spending the rest of the season there, going 3-7 with a 5.42 ERA in 16 starts. The Braves had several young prospects they wanted to gain experience at the big-league level late in the season, and those pitchers filled out the rotation in the final weeks of the season.

Former general manager John Coppolella indicated an interest in bringing Medlen back for 2018, but Coppolella was forced to resign after the season amid a Major League Baseball investigation that led to serious penalties for the Braves and a lifetime ban from baseball for Coppolella.

Medlen, an affable southern California native, debuted in the majors with Atlanta in 2009 and went 41-25 with a 3.25 ERA in 173 games (75 starts) over parts of five seasons through 2013. He was a sensation for the Braves in 2012, going 10-1 with a 1.57 ERA in 50 games including 9-0 with a puny 0.97 ERA in 12 starts after a midseason move to the rotation.

He had his second Tommy John elbow surgery with the Braves during spring training 2014, missed that entire season and then left as a free agent, signing a two-year, $8.5 million deal with Kansas City – an indication of how highly thought of Medlen was by Royals general manager Dayton Moore, a former Braves assistant GM.


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0026.  Watch James Jeff Sparks

Subject: PROGRESS REPORT

I continue to get stronger and better, even as I get older.

I have really come to appreciate how important it is to push back toward 2B with the glove foot and 'force couple.'

This gives tremendous arm speed and a beautiful & repeatable straight drive line.

Does that make sense?

Also, the football throws are the most significant influence on my MPCs.

I actually imagine the football resting against my forearm even when throwing baseball MPCs.

Amazing stuff.

Thanks much!


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     As you push back and push forward, you are like 'Samson.'

     The farther that you move down the 'acromial line,' the greater your power.

     Congratulation.

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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, February, 18, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0027.  Baseball players turn to football-style training
APPublished 3:08 a.m. ET Feb. 09, 2018

Professional baseball player Jordan Schafer, center, works out at the Coach Tom Shaw Performance camp using football training techniques as Jose Lobaton, left, and Carlos Gonzalez watch, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Carrying their bats and gloves, they leave the weight room and walk the palm tree-lined path past the baseball diamonds to the track.

Weight sleds and tires await the boys of summer for the kind of workouts typically reserved for men who make their living on the gridiron in the fall. At the Coach Tom Shaw Performance camp at Disney's Wide World of Sports Complex, it's common to see Carlos Gonzalez, Martin Prado, Ender Inciarte and several other major leaguers working out alongside football players preparing for the NFL combine and doing the same kind of drills.

Players believe these nontraditional winter workouts, a mix of strength- and endurance-training, football cutting drills and some more common baseball moves, make them quicker, more prepared for spring training and better equipped to stay healthy for the 162-game season.

"Quickness, footwork, all the stuff you use in baseball he perfectly adapted to our workouts," said Prado, an infielder for the Miami Marlins who has been working out with Shaw since October as part of his ninth year in the program. "He tried over the years to combine football workouts with less intensity for baseball players. ... He mixes it up in a way that you actually feel comfortable working out with football kind of workouts but converting to baseball."

Shaw won three Super Bowls as speed and conditioning coach of the New England Patriots, and his facility is known as a place where Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott, potential draftees and other football players come for intense workouts. He had no baseball background prior to nine years ago when Prado and Jordan Schafer were among the first players from that sport to seek out a different kind of offseason training regimen.

Over the better part of the past decade, more players have joined, including Cleveland Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor, Seattle Mariners infielder Dee Gordon and Milwaukee Brewers utility player Hernan Perez. Gonzalez tried the program after injuries limited him to 70 games in 2014, and he has since rounded back into All-Star form with 79 home runs and 254 RBIs.

"What we all do here, we feel ready," Gonzalez said. "We feel ready from the get-go, from the first day of spring training. Obviously your body's going to feel stronger and you're mentally prepared, too. ... It's a great way to keep us in great shape during the offseason. When you feel that strong and you feel healthy, all you've got to do is just maintain through spring training and the regular season."

There are 31 players of various levels all the way down to high school taking part in Shaw's baseball program, which prioritizes explosive speed that players can use in the field and running bases.

"Speed changes the game, so all the drills that we do here, they correspond to every sport," said trainer Kelsey Martinez, who runs Shaw's baseball program. "Whether we're doing straight-ahead speed work or side-to-side movements — anything like that — we're trying to gain speed and gain ground in those drills."

One day, that means loading sand bags into tires and first walking and then sprinting down the track. Another day, it's cutting like wide receivers or using the sand pit to provide some extra movement resistance.

Sure, there's work in batting cages and on the field, but it's not your typical winter wind-up.

"It's all about building athleticism," said Schafer, a natural outfielder who's also now pitching for the St. Louis Cardinals. "If you can build athleticism, usually you can make adjustments quicker. The more athletic you are, the more core stability you have, the more explosiveness. It's not baseball-specific, per se, but all that athleticism translates whether I'm in the outfield and I have to turn to go get a ball or stealing a base."

Baseball players aren't as big or strong as their football counterparts, so the workouts aren't exactly the same. Shaw is careful not to change players' running forms, so sleds and weights are reduced from typical pre-combine drills with the long haul in mind.

"We want to make sure we're working on things they're going to actually do on the field," Shaw said. "A baseball player is going to do things to get stronger and more explosive and they got to last a long time. ... We've got to make sure they're ready for that."

Inciarte feels ready. Coming off an All-Star season with the Atlanta Braves, the 23-year-old thinks previous training techniques contributed to injuries, and he sees the "complete work" done by incorporating football methods as a way to help with injury prevention.

"In baseball you always have to do a lot of movement," Inciarte said. "Those kind of movements help us most of all to stay healthy. Sometimes because you don't work on it all the time in baseball, when you react like that you can get hurt. But once you've been doing it on a consistently daily basis, you're going to be ready for anything that happens on the baseball field."

New York Mets catcher Jose Lobaton is used to what happens on the baseball field but had never worked out with football players before. Lobaton talks to the other baseball players about the way the football guys run and lift, learning something along the way even while they find the strength disparity in the weight room daunting.

"Sometimes it kind of sucks because they're just so much faster and stronger," Los Angeles Dodgers minor leaguer Edwin Rios said. "But it is cool just to kind of hear the stuff they do, the explosive stuff they do."

Running back Kapri Bibbs, who signed with the Washington Redskins late last season, admires how hard the baseball players work out when they're still months from starting the season.

"They don't want to have a cap on their talent, so they work harder than most people I'm ever around," Bibbs said. "It's awesome working out with CarGo and all those guys because they go to the extreme."

There's an added benefit of having baseball players working alongside football players, and not just the occasional playing around like when Detroit Lions linebacker Jarrad Davis joined them for fielding drills. Put highly competitive professional athletes together in one complex, and they're bound to try to outdo each other.

"Baseball is always trying to compete with football," Martinez said. "They always want to be better, and they look at the football players as like these extreme athletes. But really the baseball (players) are all-around great athletes, and to see them work together and compete together is really, really cool."


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     Nothing that they do helps baseball pitchers.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0028.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

TWO QUESTIONS

(1) What became of the young man in the red shirt on the CD you sent.

He looked brilliant and I study him often.

(2) I have evolved to almost start my motion in the sling shot position.

That is, I have a more abbreviated pendulum swing that is more akin to a tennis player taking his racket back to serve.

I am pretty sure I do everything else correctly, but I am not "long" in the back as I step forward.

None-the-less, my pendulum swing is technically correct in all other ways that you prescribe.

My WW, IB, and football throws are stronger and more effective this way too.

I find that if I "try" to do a long & full pendulum swing throwing baseballs, I have a tendency to rush a little and leave the arm behind.

I have a harder time getting into the sling shot position.

I prefer to start out more like a tennis server...it is then that I throw unbelievably hard with great feel, accuracy, and spin rates.

Also, I throw down my acromial line better with a faster pronation snap.

The sling shot position is the operative mechanism...from there I can really force-couple, engage the latissimus dorsi, triceps, pronator teres, and achieve an excellent drive line.

From the start of my motion, my main objective is to get into the sling shot position; I no longer focus very much on the pendulum swing (although I still DO an abbreviated pendulum swing).

What are your thoughts?

Does any of that sound problematic?

Thanks much!


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     That disk is not to be seen yet.

     The tennis serve and our pitching motion are the same.

     The Front foot steps forward when the pendulum swing is forty-five behind the body.

     When the heel of the Front foot touches the ground, the Front foot moves the body backward and the Rear foot moves forward.

     For the 'pronation snap' to get quicker, you need to practice Lid throws.

     When you use the wrist weights, do you 'horizontal rebound?'

     You wrote, "The sling shot position is the operative mechanism...from there I can really force-couple, engage the latissimus dorsi, triceps, pronator teres, and achieve an excellent drive line."

     You have little to learn.

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0029.  The five minute video that wins the game

I received your disk today.

This video has been online with access from your web site along with your entire training system since 2008.

Am I misunderstanding what you desire?

The five minutes that mean everything

Take Care


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     You are correct.

     However, the five minutes is the big picture.

     Thank you.

     In 1974, I used the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     In 2010 or so learned how to pronate their curves and even they injured the backs.

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0030.  The five minute video that wins the game

Please forgive me, however I am not sure what you are looking for.

The video is on youtube already.

I know this is an extremely important section of the video.

It is the key to everything you discovered and that is incredibly important.

The second part of your recent email tells me something new.

"In 2010 or so learned how to pronate their curves and even they injured their backs."

Was that in the new video and I just missed it entirely when I watched the one you sent?

I am just having trouble understanding the task you wish for me to do.

Whatever you want, I will be more than happy to do.

Youtube now has monetization where you can get paid for people watching your videos.

I have emailed them about setting up a monetization account for you.

Let me know if you would like to pursue that.


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     I knew that Kershaw and the guy with the Cubs injured their backs.

     I would like you to set up a monetization account.

     It will rule pitchers throwing curveballs.

     Thank you.

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0031.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

TWO QUESTIONS

Thanks much for the response.

Can you please explain "horizontal rebound"?

In the meantime, I'll research the Q & A files.

Thanks again!


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     When the pendulum swing reaches forty-five degrees behind your back, you use the Pectoralis Major to life your arm to shoulder height.

     When the upper arm moves from shoulder height to near vertical.

     In the middle of the shoulder height and upper arm near vertical, the Latissimus Dorsi takes control.

     With the forearm slightly outside the line between second base and home plate, the 'horizontal rebound' begins.

     When the upper arm moves from outside of the line between second base add home plate, the pitchers move their the upper arm moves from inside to outward.

     That stretched the Latissimus Dorsi tendon for the 'horizontal rebound.'

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0032.  Honeywell suffers right forearm strain during live bullpen session
USA Today
February 22, 2018

After a winter of cutting payroll and unfavorable trades, the Tampa Bay Rays now face an uncertain future with their top pitching prospect.

Brent Honeywell left a live bullpen session with a "right forearm strain," manager Kevin Cash said.

"Obviously it's unfortunate. We'll let the doctors and trainers get a look at him."

He will be further evaluated.

Honeywell, who turns 22 in March, wasn't expected to break camp with the Rays. There was speculation that he would after the club traded Jake Odorrizi to the Minnesota Twins, but Cash said he likely will open the season with a four-man rotation that includes Chris Archer, Blake Snell, Jake Faria and Nathan Eovaldi until at least May.

Honeywell mixes a mid-90s fastball with a screwball he learned from former Cy Young winner Mike Marshall.

In a full season in Class AAA, he went 12-8 with a 3.64 ERA with a 4.90 strikeout per walk ratio.


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     Brent Honeywell listens to the ignorant minor league pitching coaches.

     If Brent Jr. does not start listening to me, then he will never get a touch of my career.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0033.  All-American Holton to miss season with elbow injury
Orlando Sentinel
February 21, 2018

Florida State's hopes of reaching its second straight College World Series suffered a significant blow after the first weekend of the season.

All-American lefty pitcher Tyler Holton suffered a torn UCL and will undergo season-ending surgery on Thursday, the school announced on Wednesday.

“Tyler is a fine young man and we’re all disappointed at this setback in his career,” longtime Florida State head coach Mike Martin said in a statement. “He’s doing the best thing right now. We’ll be there for him and help guide him through the rehab process, but as a team, we have to keep moving forward on our goals for this season.”

Holton, a junior, was a first-team All-American in 2017, leading the Seminoles with a 10-3 record and 144 strikeouts last season.

Holton suffered the injury during FSU’s opening day victory over Xavier. He left the game in the fifth inning with what Martin described as “tightness” after the game. Holton had six strikeouts, and surrendered just a walk and one hit before leaving the game.

Now, the Seminoles are tasked with replacing their ace starter who was slated to start on Fridays.


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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

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0034.  Texas Tech's Gingery out for year with elbow trouble
FanSided
February 20, 2018

Texas Tech baseball will be without its ace Steven Gingery this season after the junior All-American suffered a torn UCL in his elbow on Saturday afternoon.

Hazy yellow clouds filled with dust have hung in the skies over Lubbock the past two days.  But they are nowhere near as dark as the clouds that hung over Dan Law Field Monday. Despite the fact that the Texas Tech baseball team is ranked in the top 5 in every national poll and is coming off of a dominant 4-game sweep of Mane to open the season, the mood surrounding the the program is understandably gloomy.

That is because on Monday, Texas Tech confirmed that its ace Steven Gingery will miss the remainder of 2018 due to a torn ligament in his pitching elbow.  The injury will require Tommy John  Surgery and likely puts Gingery on the shelf for at least a full calendar year.

The junior was a unanimous preseason All-American and Big 12 Pitcher of the Year.  In 2017, he had perhaps the best season any Red Raider pitcher has ever had.  He was 10-1 with a 1.58 ERA as he racked up Big 12 and national Pitcher of the Year awards and a slew of All-American honors.

But after only two innings, Gingery’s 2018 season is over.  Just 19 pitches into his start on Saturday, Gingery left the game with elbow discomfort which turned out to be a torn ligament.

Now, the Texas Tech baseball team must adjust its weekend rotation.  Gingery was the Saturday starter last season and his dominance in the middle game of each conference series was huge in either clinching a series win or preventing a losing streak en route to helping the Red Raiders capture the Big 12 regular season title.

Fortunately, head coach Tim Tadlock has an embarrassment of riches on his pitching staff, including another ace.  That  role now falls back on the shoulders of junior Davis Martin.

Martin was a freshman All-American in 2016 with an ERA of 2.52 and a 10-1 record.  He entered 2017 as the staff ace but was shut down for approximately two months with a shoulder injury.  Martin is now healthy and again will need to be the Red Raider’s leader on the mound.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, February 25, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0035.  Jim Mecir story

This week I met Former Major League baseball pitcher Jim Mecir at a Toastmaster meeting and he told me about an incident he had with a pitching coach.

His team was ahead by 1 run in the bottom of the 9th and another pitcher loaded the bases with no outs.

They bring Jim to the mound and he’s thinking he is being put in a terrible position, but what the hell, I might as well try my best.

He strikes out the 1st batter and his confidence suddenly goes way up. He strikes out the 2nd batter and his confidence is now sky high. He can’t wait to get to the next batter.

But then his pitching coach calls time out and slowly walks to the mound.

Jim is thinking that Coach is going to give him some important advice that will help him get the 3rd out.

So he asks him what’s up, and the coach says, “I just wanted to make sure we’re all on the same page.” And then he walks back to the dugout.

What the Hell? Now Jim is pissed. The momentum is gone. Jim begins to doubt himself.

He starts thinking too much and gives up a double that scores 2 runs and loses the game. His coach had sabotaged his pitching performance.

Jim never trusted him again after that.

So, I guess that you are not the only one who had issues with pitching coaches.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When I played, I kept every batter and every pitch.

     With that information, I wrote the six pitches for every batter. I knew the six pitches I wanted for every batter in the roster.

     Before every batter, I followed their six pitches.

     Before every pitch, I imagined how the I wanted my pitches to look.

     Like Jim, I never trusted pitching coaches.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0036.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

Thank you for allowing me to train with you again. It always helps me get better and sharpen my skills.

When ever I throw inside the vertical and try to scrape my cap, I usually miss too high?

Sometimes to throw lower I cheat myself and try to throw the ball low on the drive line but it makes me fly out and that's not good.

What are your thoughts?

What adjustments do I make?

Also, How do I get more movement on my torque Fastball?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     You cannot be talking about your Pronation Curves. They are great.

     With the sinker, you have to wait to the end of the acromial line before you 'Pronation Snap.'

     Your upper arm acts as the forearm.

     That way you do not need to scrape your cap.

     To get more on your Torque Fastball, you have to cross step farther and turn your back to home plate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0037.  Watch James Jeffery Sparks

I'm mainly just trying to eliminate the high and throwing arm side Sinker and reverse breakers.

I don't quite have the sinker down or the screwball, so I just throw that screwger where I just spiral it with my hand going towards the third base dugout.

I use your screwball grip and act like I'm spiraling a football except with the back of palm facing my head.

It's a little easier, but I need to get down the sinker.

I guess I need to turn my shoulders more and wait longer to spin it?

Is the sinker thrown exactly like your slider except the opposite... would you say?

For some reason, I can't get as much on the torque fastball as if I dropped stepped it.

It also is a little sharper when I drop step it.

I wonder why this happens.

What are your thoughts?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Only one pitcher could throw a four-seam True Screwball, so don't worry about it.

     Only Sparks could throw a Screwker well.

     A sinker and a slider look like a sinker and a slider, but with a opposite circle.

     To lay the Torque Fastball sideways, you have to cross step and rotate your body until you cannot see your front.

     To drop step, you throw the Maxline Fastball and you can see your body.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0038.  MLB Grant Proposal

Just checking.

I assume you have not heard anything yet from MLB on the proposal?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I put my Grant material on January 16, 2018.

     On February 15, 2018, I posted my 'Research Begins."

     Now 'Research Begin' is in YouTube.

     Nobody has talked about me getting a 'Grant.'

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0039.  Honeywell arm injury

Hey coach.

I've been in touch with Brent Sr. and fully know if Jr's UCL injury.

Question to you.

Any short or long answer why that type of injury occurred?

I know he's a disciple of your teaching.

Iron ball, wrong foot, etc.

Was/is this injury inevitable at this level?

Was there a breakdown in technique?

Wondering because I teach 2 of my boys same methods!

Should I change something to avoid this type of injury?

Lastly, what age can I start teaching these methods?

Hope your well and would appreciate any feedback you could extend!


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The Rays minor league pitching coaches have taught Brent Jr. to injure himself in two ways.

     Brent Jr. refuses to talk with me.

     If Brent Jr. does not do what I teach, then he will be a mess.

     Make sure that you and his sons learn what I teach.

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0040.  Watch James Jeffery Sparks

I'm still having trouble taking my head too far over towards the first base side.

I have to eliminate yanking my screwger to the glove side of home plate.

I don't quite have the confidence in it yet to throw it in non-fastball counts.

Other than beating at the skills every day, how do I hit with this pitch in fastball counts?

Also, what was your mindset when you pitched?

Did you focus on cues or anything or did you just try to strike the guy out and that's it?

What are your thoughts?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Your slider will cover when batters are looking for your Maxline Fastballs.

     Throw your Maxline Fastball after the sliders.

     Your sinker will cover when batters are looking for your Torque Fastballs.

     Throw your Torque Fastball after the sinkers.

     Your Curveballs to both sides of the plate will get your outs.

     Keep the batters guessing.

     Never throw the same pitches back to back.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0041.  Watch James Jeffery Sparks

Also,

I have a problem with glove foot float.

Especially when expected to have a "leg kick" on my stride out.

This is what takes my head and mass to the first base side.

How can I at least decrease glove foot float on my stride out?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When the pitching coaches want you to 'leg kick,' lift your Front foot slowly, then be quick with getting the heel of your Front foot on the ground to pull the body backward and drive your Back knee diagonally forward.

     Always keep your Rear foot forty-five degrees to the rubber.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0042.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

I think the main reason I have glove foot float is because I collapse my pitching leg on the rubber when I do the leg lift.

I remember you telling me to not let my head lower on stride out.

How else can I keep my pitching leg tall?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Stand on your Front toes and reach your pitching arm as high as you can.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, March, 04, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0043.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

My men’s team is about 5 weeks away from our season opener, and as always I have been training and throwing throughout the winter. This week on one of my bullpen sessions, my teammate catcher could not make it so, Eric caught me.

He said it was the hardest I have ever thrown to him. I told him I keep tweaking my delivery so I can be as close to pure “Marshall” as I can get. And every time I get closer to perfection, the velocity and late movement on all my pitches improves.

He had not caught me for about two years and he was surprised at the increase of velocity. He said quite frankly when he was playing at the Univ of Arkansas the pitchers would sometimes warmup other pitchers during practice and intersquad games. He said I am throwing as hard as most of them do.

He said the four seam maxline fastball appears to rise and explode when it is up. When it is down in the zone it sinks about 3 inches and moves very late to the pitching arm side 8 to 9 inches. My slider and pronation curve are both late breaking and have a lot of depth he said.

Eric has not touched a baseball in 2 years, but he works out and stays in great shape. So after my bullpen was over, he started throwing to me and his fastball was explosive and scary. He said he was amazed he could throw that well after not throwing for 24 months. I couldn’t let him throw at 100% because I feared I couldn’t follow it and would get hit.

I told him that you had told me after seeing him throw that you believed he had potential to throw 96 to 98 with hard work a few years ago. He is 25 years old and completely mature and can throw the crap out of the ball without any pain or discomfort.

I laughed and told him it’s still not too late to get in shape and give baseball another try if he wanted.

I am simply amazed that at my age of 58, I can throw 80 mph plus, and most of the men in my age division are lucky to throw their age.

Thanks from both of us, Doc!!!!!

Randy & Eric


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The Marshall Pitching Motion is what pitching should be.

     Have you seen the YouTube's 'Research Begins?'

     Five minutes is all they need.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, March, 11, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0044.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

My stuff is good.

I'm getting better feel for the reverse breaking ball, but when it comes game time things speed up and my arm wants to come across and it's hard to find that release point.

I need to get the Screwger inside the vertical, but haven't been able to get much movement throwing it inside.

The sinker is coming along and almost game ready as well.

My fastballs are good and hard to hit, but I miss high for balls too often.

Overall, I'm confident in my stuff going into this season.

What are your thoughts?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The more that you pitch, the better you will become.

     Take a deep breath before every pitch.

     That you feel that your sinker is ready.

     When you high with fastballs, it means that you are not on standing tall and leaning downward.

     The key is to imagine the pitch that you are about throw before you throw it.

     I have watched you throw.

     When a pitch in practice goes bad, you quickly throw a great pitch.

     Deep breath and throw what you imagine.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0045.  Friday, March 16, 2018

Dear Gary Green M.D.,

     On January 15, 2018, my seventh-fifth birthday, Michael "Grant" Marshall mailed my 'Grant" to save baseball pitchers.

     Now, on March 15, 2018, two months later, Michael "Grant" Marshall needs help to save baseball pitchers.

     If Gary Green M.D. does not teach the eight orthopedic surgeons how to use the Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometers Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arm manual, baseball pitchers will continue to bang their olecranon process into their olecranon fossa and destroy their elbows.

     The five minute 'Research Begins' shows how I learned how to pitch.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games and 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games and pitched batting practice on days that I did not pitch.

     After thirty-five years, two pitchers learned how to not bang their olecranon process into the olecranon fossa.

     The Marshall Pitching Motion will change baseball pitchers and eliminate pitching injuries.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dr. Mike Marshall
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2018 1:34:55 AM
To: Green, Gary M.D. (Contractor)
Subject: Dr. Green is the only way to stop injuring pitching elbows.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Dear Gary Green M.D.,

     On January 15, 2018, my seventh-fifth birthday, Michael "Grant" Marshall mailed my 'Grant" to save baseball pitchers.

     Now, on March 15, 2018, two months later, Michael "Grant" Marshall needs help to save baseball pitchers.

     If Gary Green M.D. does not teach the eight orthopedic surgeons how to use the Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometers Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arm manual, baseball pitchers will continue to bang their olecranon process into their olecranon fossa and destroy their elbows.

     The five minute 'Research Begins' shows how I learned how to pitch.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games and 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games and pitched batting practice on days that I did not pitch.

     After thirty-five years, two pitchers learned how to not bang their olecranon process into the olecranon fossa.

     The Marshall Pitching Motion will change baseball pitchers and eliminate pitching injuries.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Green, Gary M.D. (Contractor) [mailto:GGreen@mednet.ucla.edu]
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2018 11:09 AM
To: Dr. Mike Marshall
Subject: Re: Dr. Green is the only way to stop injuring pitching elbows.

Dr. Marshall,

I checked my files and those of the Research Committee and we cannot find any grant that you submitted in January of 2018.

I had written you in November explaining what needed to be done with your proposal in order to evaluate it.

There is no doubt that you have personal expertise in this area, but that alone is not a fundable project.

As I wrote to you before, it needs to follow a basic research format so that we can evaluate its merits.

Let me know if you need any information to assist you.

Gary Green


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Gary Green M.D.,

     This is how Dr. Mike Marshall entered the "Grant."

     At January 13, 2018, I entered the Goin' Postal on 38439 5th Avenue in Zephyrhills, FL 33439.

     At 9:14 AM, the clerk took $41.22 for Standard Overnight.

     The Recipient's name is John D' Angelo, the Senior Director, League Economics and Strategy Major League Baseball.

     Mr. D' Angelo works at 34th Floor on 245 Park Avenue in New York, NY 10167 with telephone number 212.931.7832.

     The Receipt is #36739.

     Invoice is 30668901.

     The clerk said that the package would arrive at 3:00 PM on Tuesday, January 16, 2018, one day after my birthday, but on Martin Luther King Jr's day.

     The clerk said that they would tell us when the package arrived.

     Now, I have to wait for the 12 injury experts to tell me whether I get the Grant or not.

     When I learn the result, I will tell those that shared my work.

     Mr. D' Angelo works for Major League Baseball on the 34th Floor at 245 Park Avenue in New York, NY 10167.

     D. McPhearson signed for the delivery.

     Dr. Mike Marshall's Grant arrived on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at 11:43am.

     Now, I have to wait until the 12 injury experts decide whether I will receive the Grant.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0046.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

In Q&A #0040 this year you wrote:

01. Your slider will cover when batters are looking for your Maxline Fastballs. Or, I can say throw your Maxline Fastball after the sliders.

02. Your sinker will cover when batters are looking for your Torque Fastballs. Or, I can say throw your Torque Fastball after the sinkers.

Do you mean throwing the slider and the sinker from the same side of the rubber as the following 4-seam fastball?

i.e. Torque slider from the Maxline side of the rubber and Maxline sinker from the torque side of the rubber?

Would it be as well correct for covering 2-seam fastballs?

And would it be correct vice versa, throwing the fastballs from the "wrong" side of the rubber, to the "wrong" side of the home plate?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I combined the two lines into one.

     Two of the four lines were saying the same thing.

     Throw the slider from the pitching side.

     Throw your Maxline Fastball from the glove side.

     Throw the sinker from the glove side.

     Throw your Torque Fastball from the pitching side.

     If Maxline and Torque Fastballs do not have two strikes, then you have to throw two-seam pitches.

     When Maxline and Torque Fastballs have two strikes, then you have to throw four-seam pitches.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0047.  Saturday, March 17, 2018

I have copied John D’ANGELO from Mlb and feel free to email him regarding your submission in January.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Dr. Green,

     I will ask Mr. D' Angelo and Mr. McPhearson to find my 'Grant.'

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0048.  Saturday, March 17, 2018

Dear Mr. D' Angelo,

     It is appropriate for me to ask Mr. D' Angelo, the Senior Director, League Economics and Strategy for Major League Baseball and works on the 34th floor of 245 Park Avenue in New York, NY 10167 with telephone number 212.931.7832 or D. McPhearson, the person that signed for the delivery to find my 'Grant?'

     It is appropriate to ask Mr. D' Angelo and Mr. D. McPhearson to find my 'Grant?'

     My telephone number is 813.783.1357 and my email is drmikemarshall@earthlink.net.

     Please find my 'Grant.'

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0049.  John D'Angelo,

Dr. Green said I could feel free to email you regarding my 'Grant.'

Hi Dr. Marshall,

I haven't received your grant yet (I have been in Arizona and Florida for most of the past six weeks), but will try to track it down this week.

Sorry for the mix-up on our end.

Thanks,

John


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi John,

     Thank you for your prompt response.

     Sincerely,

Mike

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0050.  The Marshall Knee drops

Does the Knee Drop exercise helps improve hips rotation, and driving the pitching knee across the glove knee?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The drop step moves the acromial line to outside of the glove side.

     When the heel of the glove foot hits the ground, the pitching knee is already off the ground and the body moves diagonally across the glove foot.

     The pitching foot does not drive anything.

     The heel of the glove foot pulls backward as the pitching knee crosses the glove knee.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0051.  Watch James Jeffrey Sparks

I will wait till I get to slingshot position or even later to explode.

This will probably help with my command as well due to being able to get on my acromial line better.

Thanks.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I agree.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0052.  Research idea

I'm in my third year of medical school and it's a time where we start to hone in on what we want to practice in the future and I have decided upon orthopaedic surgery.

Having said that, I am trying to start my own research project.

I have looked into the literature in the orthopaedic world and there is (not surprisingly) little addressing the correlation between size of distal insertions of rotator cuff muscles and the incidence of injury with baseball pitchers.

I have pitched (ha-ha) the idea to an shoulder surgeon that is an ortho doc with University of Louisville.

The idea is in it's infancy (we could potentially use arthroscopy in current cases with a prospective research project) or we could look back at already injured players (which would be a project more quickly completed compared to the prospective project).

Do you have any thoughts?

I remember talking many times about the fact that the size of the rotator cuff muscle distal insertion sites are smaller compared to Latissimus Dorsi and Teres Major.

That's where I got the idea to do this project.

My thought is if I can show a strong statistical correlation with size of rotator cuff muscle (the smaller they are the worse the injury) with injury and severity of injury, then I can continue to walk them towards understanding and not being able to deny the good of your motion.

Obviously, you have already shown this by the amount of data you have over years with pitchers you have trained, I would just love to have ortho docs admit that there is data in the ortho world supporting your motion.

I would love to stay connected to my baseball training with you in my career as an orthopaedic surgeon.

Please let me know your thoughts.

Additionally, my dad and I were talking last night about how we want to come visit again sometime in the next year.

Hope you and Erica are doing well!


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I am looking for a 'Grant.'

     In my 'Grant,' I am writing a manual for the Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometer Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arms.

     This goniometer will show how much pitchers that throw curveballs lose the extension and flexion of the elbow.

     Pitchers that release their curveballs over the top of the Index finger will destroy the pitchers' elbows.

     To prevent destroying the pitchers' elbows, pitchers need to release their curveballs under the Middle finger.

     When pitchers release their curveballs under the Middle finger, pitchers have to reach back to second base and throw the baseball down the acromial line.

     In the last few years, only two pitchers released their curveball below the Middle finger.

     In 1972, I was fourth in the Cy Young.

     In 1973, I was second in the Cy Young.

     In 1974, I was first in the Cy Young.

     In 1976, I was the fifth in the Cy Young.

     In 1977, I was seventh in the Cy Young.

     Charlie, I am not a big guy or great stamina, but I win the Cy Youngs.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games, 208 innings, 13 straight games and when I did not pitch the night I pitched to the batting practice to the extra batters.

     I developed the Marshall Pitching Motion that eliminates an injury.

     Forget the rotator cuff muscles and the incidence of injury with baseball pitchers.

     If you are interested, I will send a my 'Research Begins' disks and a professional pitcher I have working with that will show how to do the Marshall Pitching Motion (do not show it to anybody else.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0053.  Phelps hopeful of full recovery from Tommy John surgery
Seattle Times
March 22, 2018

PEORIA, AZ: There were two outs in the ninth inning of a spring training game his team led 7-0 about as meaningless as professional sports can get.

But facing a 2-2 count on Chris Carter of the Angels on Saturday, Mariner reliever David Phelps didn’t care that the result didn’t matter, his spot on the team long-since secure.

“I told myself ‘I can’t just lay a fastball in there," he said. “I tried to step on it a little bit more. But I didn’t throw it any different than I had ever thrown a fastball. It wanted to go, and it did."

What went was the ulnar collateral ligament in Phelps’ right elbow, an injury that will result in Phelps undergoing Tommy John surgery on Monday and his season coming to an all-too-sudden end.

“We are passionate about this game since the time we are probably 5 years old and then having to sit out for a full year is going to be tough," Phelps said.

In fact, it means there’s a chance that Phelps has thrown his final pitch as a Mariner since he will be a free agent at the end of the season.

What it also means is the Mariners having to reconfigure their bullpen a little bit to adjust for the loss of a pitcher they hoped would be a shutdown late-inning setup man for closer Edwin Diaz.

Phelps was acquired last July in a trade with Florida. He pitched just 8.2 innings in 10 games while dealing with two separate elbow injuries, neither of which he said were related to the injury that happened Saturday.

A surgery to remove bone spurs in September he thought had fixed his issues and had him feeling as healthy as ever this spring.

While he had had a couple of rocky outings (he had a 9.00 earned run average in four innings in five games) he said he thought he was in regular season form during his last outing.

“I finally felt like I was locked in that last outing," said Phelps, who threw one scoreless inning against the Angels. “I was throwing my fastball where I wanted to and the second-to-last pitch is when I felt something and then I threw another one (getting Carter to ground out) and that’s when it (went)."

The Mariners added to their bullpen depth in the offseason with the signing of Juan Nicasio. And the return of Diaz and setup man Nick Vincent, lefty Marc Rzepczynski and the spring emergence of Dan Altavilla (12 strikeouts and two earned runs allowed in 8.2 innings) has Mariner manager Scott Servais still feeling good about the pen.

Phelps, who will 32 in October, said he plans to return to Seattle following his surgery, which will be performed by famed Dr. James Andrews in Alabama, to undergo his rehab and stay close to the team.

“A couple of the guys that I have reached out to (who have had Tommy John surgery), say it’s all the same,’’ he said. “It’s a year off but you will come back stronger than you were. It’s great to hear, it’s another thing looking at that year ahead that you have. But work has never been a problem. I love this game. I love the grind that it entails. So this is just another step.’


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0054.  Rangers absorb bad news of Ragans' Tommy John Surgery, elbow issue for Cody
Dallas Morning News
March 18, 2018

SURPRISE, AZ: The Rangers' touted wave of young pitching talent has absorbed "a pretty big body blow" with news that 2016 first-round draft pick Cole Ragans is out for the year. And it's entirely possible the same may eventually be the case for 2017 Minor League Pitcher of the Year Kyle Cody.

The Rangers announced Sunday what seemed inevitable from the moment Ragans walked off a mound Thursday: He has a tear in the left ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow. He will undergo Tommy John surgery, perhaps as early as this week, and will miss the season. The usual recovery period is 12-14 months.

Also on Sunday, the Rangers revealed that right-hander Cody, last year's big riser among pitching prospects, has been dealing with elbow inflammation for the last three weeks and will be shut down for at least another three or four weeks.

It is particularly discouraging news for an organization that has found itself barren of pitching prospects at the top level of the minor leagues because of trades and attrition. The Rangers have been touting the lower levels of the minors as the foundation for a pitching resurgence.

Rangers assistant general manager Jayce Tingler said Cody does not have a tear, but when asked if surgery is not concern, he said "that would not be accurate." The Rangers will reassess the situation in three to four weeks.

For context, the Rangers last week said right-hander Clayton Blackburn had a strain of the UCL ligament and will be rested for three to four weeks before being reassessed. If the elbow does not show improvement at that point, Tommy John surgery could be a possibility.

"This kind of thing is never easy," Tingler said. "We feel for the young players and have compassion for what they are dealing with. From an organization and development perspective, it's a pretty big body blow. We are built for this. We have depth. We are going to have some guys who get opportunities and will have to step up."

Depending on the source, Ragans, 20, is considered the top or second-best pitching prospect in the organization. He spent 2017 at short-season Class A Spokane, where he was 3-2 with a 3.61 ERA.

Cody, 23, seemed to be one of the major beneficiaries of the Rangers' emphasis on fastball command in the lower levels last year. He was 9-6 with a 2.54 ERA over 23 starts at low Class A Hickory and advanced to Class A Down East. He held opponents to a .219 batting average and .592 OPS. After a slow start, he went 8-0 over his final 14 starts with a 1.81 ERA.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0055.  Associated Press
March 17, 2018

MESA, AZ: Oakland Athletics pitcher Jharel Cotton will undergo season-ending surgery on his right elbow.

Cotton was diagnosed with a sprain and had a second scan taken on his elbow on Friday. Then he was told he would need Tommy John surgery. The procedure is expected to take place next week.

"It's tough. I'm missing the 2018 season with my boys, so it's kind of hard to take. I'm trying to take it as best as I can and just get ready for the long process, the long road that's ahead," Cotton said Saturday morning at A's spring training.

The 26-year-old Cotton was expected to be in Oakland's starting rotation this season after going 9-10 with a 5.58 ERA in 24 starts as a rookie in 2017.

He pitched four times this spring, with a 3.75 ERA and 16 strikeouts in 12 innings.

"Unfortunate. Just of him having to go through what a lot of guys have to go through,'' A's manager Bob Melvin said. "But we felt like he was on the cusp of really coming into his own, and it's going to be delayed a year, unfortunately."


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0056.  Texas Tech's Gingery out for year with elbow trouble
FanSided
February 20, 2018

Texas Tech baseball will be without its ace Steven Gingery this season after the junior All-American suffered a torn UCL in his elbow on Saturday afternoon.

Hazy yellow clouds filled with dust have hung in the skies over Lubbock the past two days.  But they are nowhere near as dark as the clouds that hung over Dan Law Field Monday. Despite the fact that the Texas Tech baseball team is ranked in the top 5 in every national poll and is coming off of a dominant 4-game sweep of Mane to open the season, the mood surrounding the the program is understandably gloomy.

That is because on Monday, Texas Tech confirmed that its ace Steven Gingery will miss the remainder of 2018 due to a torn ligament in his pitching elbow.  The injury will require Tommy John  Surgery and likely puts Gingery on the shelf for at least a full calendar year.

The junior was a unanimous preseason All-American and Big 12 Pitcher of the Year.  In 2017, he had perhaps the best season any Red Raider pitcher has ever had.  He was 10-1 with a 1.58 ERA as he racked up Big 12 and national Pitcher of the Year awards and a slew of All-American honors.

But after only two innings, Gingery’s 2018 season is over.  Just 19 pitches into his start on Saturday, Gingery left the game with elbow discomfort which turned out to be a torn ligament.

Now, the Texas Tech baseball team must adjust its weekend rotation.  Gingery was the Saturday starter last season and his dominance in the middle game of each conference series was huge in either clinching a series win or preventing a losing streak en route to helping the Red Raiders capture the Big 12 regular season title.

Fortunately, head coach Tim Tadlock has an embarrassment of riches on his pitching staff, including another ace.  That  role now falls back on the shoulders of junior Davis Martin.

Martin was a freshman All-American in 2016 with an ERA of 2.52 and a 10-1 record.  He entered 2017 as the staff ace but was shut down for approximately two months with a shoulder injury.  Martin is now healthy and again will need to be the Red Raider’s leader on the mound.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0057.  Have you found my 'Grant?"

Hi John D' Angelo,

     You said: "I haven't received your 'Grant' yet, but I will try to track it down this week."

     Between you and Mr. McPhearson, the two of you should have found my 'Grant.'

     Spring Training is nearly over.

     That takes my opportunity to talk with the general managers.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0058.  Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Hi John,

     I put the five-minute 'Research Begin' disk and the 'Grant' in the Cushioned Self-Sealing Bubble Mailer.

     The 'Grant' will arrive tomorrow.

     The two months between January 15 and March 28, 2018 has taken my away the my opportunity to explain what the 'Grant' will do for pitchers that throw curveballs.

     Now, I need traveling money.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0059.  The 'Grant' arrived today.
Thursday, March 29, 2018 11:14 AM

Thanks for submitting this and appears it has been received.

It will be reviewed at the next research meeting in July.

Applicants will generally receive a decision about a month after our research meeting.

Gary Green, MD


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Dr. Green,

        The two months between January 15, 2018 and March 29, 2018 have taken my opportunity to explain what the 'Grant' will do for pitchers that throw curveballs.

     The Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometer Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arms manual will make measuring easy for Extension and Flexion for Dominant and Non-Dominant arms.

     Orthopedic surgeons will find that:

01. Pitchers that throw curveballs release baseballs over the top of the Index finger that destroys the elbow.

AND

02. Pitchers that throw curveballs release baseballs under the Middle finger that does not destroy the elbow.

        Now, I need traveling money to explain to general managers.

     Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Marshall

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0060.  They finally found the 'Grant.'
Thursday, March 29, 2018 6:20 PM

Excellent!

At least it is in their hands.

Now we do more waiting.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     We will not know if I get the 'Grant' until to the middle of August.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0061.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly Numbers and Strikeout Breakdown
Saturday, March 31, 2018 2:22 PM

THU (3/29)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 307.31
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.44
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 8.31
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 15.74

FRI (3/30)--11 games
Average number of pitches per game: 322.55
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.14
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 8.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.05

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 3/29-30/2018

No out: 147
--------------
None on: 112
Runner at first: 21
Runners at first and second: 4
Runners at first and third: 0
Bases loaded: 2
Runner at second: 7
Runners at second and third: 0
Runner at third: 1

One out: 148
------------
None on: 90
Runner at first: 23
Runners at first and second: 14
Runners at first and third: 5
Bases loaded: 2
Runner at second: 11
Runners at second and third: 3
Runner at third: 0

Two outs: 153
-------------
None on: 73
Runner at first: 24
Runners at first and second: 15
Runners at first and third:
Bases loaded: 5
Runner at second: 14
Runners at second and third: 8
Runner at third: 9

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 147/662 (22.21%)
------------
None on: 112/486 (23.05%)
Runner at first: 21/102 (20.59%)
Runners at first and second: 4/22 (18.18%)
Runners at first and third: 0/7 (0.00%)
Bases loaded: 2/8 (25.00%)
Runner at second: 7/28 (25.00%)
Runners at second and third: 0/3 (0.00%)
Runner at third: 1/6 (16.67%)

One out: 148/637 (23.23%)
------------
None on: 90/361 (24.93%)
Runner at first: 23/128 (17.97%)
Runners at first and second: 14/39 (35.90%)
Runners at first and third: 5/19 (26.32%)
Bases loaded: 2/12 (16.67%)
Runner at second: 11/53 (20.75%)
Runners at second and third: 3/9 (33.33%)
Runner at third: 0/16 (0.00%)

Two outs: 153/639 (23.94%)
-------------
None on: 73/292 (25.00%)
Runner at first: 24/126 (19.05%)
Runners at first and second: 15/60 (25.00%)
Runners at first and third: 5/21 (23.81%)
Bases loaded: 5/20 (25.00%)
Runner at second: 14/69 (20.29%)
Runners at second and third: 8/21 (38.10%)
Runner at third: 9/20 (45.00%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Apr 01, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0062.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly Numbers & Strikeout Breakdown (3/31-4/6/18)
Saturday, April 07, 2018 1:36 PM

SAT (3/31)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 303.07
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.97
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.79
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.37

SUN (4/1)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 289.17
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.37
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.08
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.92

MON (4/2)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 314.75
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.01
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.42
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.68

TUE (4/3)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 302.69
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.82
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.37

WED (4/4)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.67
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.41
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.08
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.66

THU (4/5)--11 games
Average number of pitches per game: 304.45
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.50
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.64
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.24

FRI (4/6)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 337.38
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.87
Average number of innings per starter: Exactly 4 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.88
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 36.51

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 3/31-4/6/2018

No out: 469
--------------
None on: 346
Runner at first: 65
Runners at first and second: 20
Runners at first and third: 7
Bases loaded: 6
Runner at second: 21
Runners at second and third: 3
Runner at third: 1

One out: 436
------------
None on: 245
Runner at first: 87
Runners at first and second: 28
Runners at first and third: 10
Bases loaded: 5
Runner at second: 32
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 16

Two outs: 482
-------------
None on: 218
Runner at first: 81
Runners at first and second: 52
Runners at first and third: 24
Bases loaded: 17
Runner at second: 56
Runners at second and third: 18
Runner at third: 16

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 469/2800 (16.75%)
------------
None on: 346/2033 (17.02%)
Runner at first: 65/421 (15.44%)
Runners at first and second: 20/109 (18.35%)
Runners at first and third: 7/33 (21.21%)
Bases loaded: 6/30 (20.00%)
Runner at second: 21/134 (15.67%)
Runners at second and third: 3/22 (13.64%)
Runner at third: 1/18 (5.55%)

One out: 436/2765 (15.77%)
------------
None on: 245/1519 (16.13%)
Runner at first: 87/562 (15.48%)
Runners at first and second: 28/180 (15.55%)
Runners at first and third: 10/89 (11.24%)
Bases loaded: 5/63 (7.94%)
Runner at second: 32/213 (15.02%)
Runners at second and third: 13/59 (22.03%)
Runner at third: 16/80 (20.00%)

Two outs: 482/2733 (17.64%)
-------------
None on: 218/1203 (18.12%)
Runner at first: 81/558 (14.52%)
Runners at first and second: 52/268 (19.40%)
Runners at first and third: 24/115 (20.87%)
Bases loaded: 17/82 (20.73%)
Runner at second: 56/313 (17.89%)
Runners at second and third: 18/85 (21.18%)
Runner at third: 16/109 (14.68%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Apr 08, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0063.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly Numbers & Strikeout Breakdown
Saturday, April 14, 2018

SAT (4/7)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 316.20
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.00
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.67
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.22

SUN (4/8)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.43
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.90
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.14
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.00

MON (4/9)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.75
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.64
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.33
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.00

TUE (4/10)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 299.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.80
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.59

WED (4/11)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 306.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.61
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.73
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.55

THU (4/12)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.38
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.93
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.25
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 23.81

FRI (4/13)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 295.43
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.81
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.50
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 15.24

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 4/7-4/13/2018

No out: 543
--------------
None on: 407
Runner at first: 72
Runners at first and second: 24
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 6
Runner at second: 17
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 5

One out: 537
------------
None on: 301
Runner at first: 93
Runners at first and second: 36
Runners at first and third: 13
Bases loaded: 20
Runner at second: 36
Runners at second and third: 22
Runner at third: 16

Two outs: 589
-------------
None on: 286
Runner at first: 96
Runners at first and second: 60
Runners at first and third: 27
Bases loaded: 26
Runner at second: 55
Runners at second and third: 23
Runner at third: 16

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 1159/5230 (22.16%)
------------
None on: 865/3773 (22.93%)
Runner at first: 158/811 (19.48%)
Runners at first and second: 48/208 (23.08%)
Runners at first and third: 15/61 (24.59%)
Bases loaded: 14/61 (22.95%)
Runner at second: 45/247 (18.22%) Runners at second and third: 7/39 (17.95%)
Runner at third: 7/30 (23.33%)

One out: 1121/5185 (21.62%)
------------
None on: 636/2786 (22.83%)
Runner at first: 203/1046 (19.41%)
Runners at first and second: 78/371 (21.02%)
Runners at first and third: 28/160 (17.50%)
Bases loaded: 27/141 (19.15%)
Runner at second: 79/393 (20.10%)
Runners at second and third: 38/136 (27.94%)
Runner at third: 32/152 (21.05%)

Two outs: 1224/5040 (24.29%)
-------------
None on: 577/2221 (25.98%)
Runner at first: 201/1011 (19.88%)
Runners at first and second: 127/476 (26.68%)
Runners at first and third: 56/218 (25.69%)
Bases loaded: 48/172 (27.91%)
Runner at second: 125/554 (22.56%)
Runners at second and third: 49/167 (29.34%)
Runner at third: 41/221 (18.55%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Apr 15 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0064.  Tommy John Surgery

When I hear of a pitcher having Tommy John surgery, it’s easy to pick out the Late Pitching Forearm Turnover and Reverse Pitching Forearm Bounce.

What is not easy to understand is why pitchers with obvious Late Pitching Arm Turnover and Reverse Pitching Forearm Bounce, do NOT rupture their Ulnar Collateral Ligament.

Do you have an explanation why some pitchers with all the signs of rupturing their Ulnar Collateral Ligament never do?

For example, is there a genetic predisposition to having a stronger ligament?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When pitchers Reverse Forearm Bounce early and hard, these pitchers cannot stand the force.

     When pitchers Reverse Forearm Bounce late and easy, these pitchers can stand the force.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers need to pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0065.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly Numbers & Strikeout Breakdown (4/14-20/2018)
Saturday, April 21, 2018

SAT (4/14)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 306.58
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.27
Average number of innings per starter: Exactly 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.25
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 30.66

SUN (4/15)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 287.40
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.15
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.67

MON (4/16)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.22
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.81
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.33
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.00

TUE (4/17)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 333.44
Average number of pitches per half inning: 18.21
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.75
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.22

WED (4/18)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 329.85
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.88
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.62
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.24

THU (4/19)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.30
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.89
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.64

FRI (4/20)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 306.13
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.66
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.06
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.84

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 4/14-4/20/2018

No out: 512
--------------
None on: 389
Runner at first: 57
Runners at first and second: 25
Runners at first and third: 5
Bases loaded: 7
Runner at second: 25
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 0

One out: 534
------------
None on: 325
Runner at first: 84
Runners at first and second: 29
Runners at first and third: 17
Bases loaded: 22
Runner at second: 41
Runners at second and third: 7
Runner at third: 9

Two outs: 514
-------------
None on: 241
Runner at first: 98
Runners at first and second: 45
Runners at first and third: 22
Bases loaded: 19
Runner at second: 55
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 21

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 1671/7556 (22.11%)
------------
None on: 1254/5397 (23.24%)
Runner at first: 215/1166 (18.44%)
Runners at first and second: 73/316 (23.10%)
Runners at first and third: 20/97 (20.62%)
Bases loaded: 21/98 (21.43%)
Runner at second: 70/369 (18.97%)
Runners at second and third: 11/67 (16.42%)
Runner at third: 7/46 (15.22%)

One out: 1655/7346 (22.53%)
------------
None on: 961/3954 (24.30%)
Runner at first: 287/1467 (19.56%)
Runners at first and second: 107/540 (19.81%)
Runners at first and third: 45/242 (18.60%)
Bases loaded: 49/204 (24.02%)
Runner at second: 120/556 (21,58%)
Runners at second and third: 45/172 (26.16%)
Runner at third: 41/211 (19.43%)

Two outs: 1738/7163 (24.26%)
-------------
None on: 818/3162 (25.87%)
Runner at first: 299/1420 (21.06%)
Runners at first and second: 172/660 (26.06%)
Runners at first and third: 78/318 (24.53%)
Bases loaded: 67/255 (26.27%)
Runner at second: 180/803 (22.42%)
Runners at second and third: 62/229 (27.07%)
Runner at third: 62/316 (19.62%)


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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Apr 22, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0066.  Tommy John Surgery

You wrote: “When pitchers Reverse Forearm Bounce late and easy, these pitchers can stand the force.”

This is an interesting response.

Elbows only flex and extend, so I don’t consider vertically raising the upper arm vertically beside the head while the elbow lays back naturally a “bounce.

This is essentially what Marshall pitchers do.

I’m seeing some pitchers somewhat short arm their pendulum swing with obvious Late Pitching Forearm Turnover and then try to immediately raise their upper arm vertically beside their head.

There still seems to be some level of “bounce” pitching this way.

Is this what you are referring to?

If not could you expound on what you mean by “late and easy”?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Let's get it right.

     I don't give a damn about pitchers that 'Reverse Forearm Bounce' their arm.

     I only care about the pendulum swing.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers need to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages need to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     Get an Internal Explorer for Google and write "YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0067.  A sports reporter needs to know
Tuesday, April 24, 2018

     To prevent damage in pitchers' elbow when they throw curveballs and sliders, you must to go to Google.

     When you get on Google, you must write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's research begins

     It starts with the Marshall Pitching Motion -YouTube.

     The Favorites -YouTube include four disks:

01. The James Jeffrey Sparks story.
02. The Biomechanical Flaws story.
03. The Injurious Flaws story.
04. The Research Begin story that prevents elbow damage.

     In the Research Begins story, pitchers must to release their curveballs under the Middle finger, not over the Index finger.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers must to pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward ad upward to driveline height in one, smooth can continuous movement toward second base followed by the Pronator Teres muscle to contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the release of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     If you want, I can send you a disk that shows how I was able to pitch 208 innings, 106 games and 13 continue games.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0068.  Can you host on wix or Word Press or blogger?

I noticed that your site is down.

Happily, the information seems to be available at archive.org.

I am concerned about you, sir, you are a very positive influence on my life, my son's life, and those of so many others.

I hate to see your brillant work vanish like this.

Thank you for everything and I hope all is well and that I hear from you very soon!


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     With my hearing aid, I could not listen to anybody, I have to read Captel.

     You start with the Internet Explorer, go to Google and write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's Research Begins

     You will see five disks.

01. Marshall Pitching Motion.

     Favorites - YouTube.

02. James Jeffrey Sparks.
03. Biomechanical Flaws.
04. Injurious Flaws.
05. Research Begins.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     In addition, you could Google and write: drmikemarshall.com.

     Click on Dr. Mike Marshall's Baseball Pitching Coach Services.

01. Watch Dr. Mike Marshall's Baseball Pitching Motion.
02. Causes of Pitching Inuries.
03. Prevent Pitching Injuries.
04. How Kinesiology Changed My Life.
05. Question/Answer Files.
06. Baseball Pitching Instructional Video.
07. Coaching Baseball Pitchers Book.
08. Baseball Pitchers Interval-Training Programs.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0069.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly Numbers & Strikeout Breakdown (4/21-27/2018)

SAT (4/21)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 280.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.26
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.73

SUN (4/22)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.14
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.72
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.79
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.89

MON (4/23)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.08
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.55
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.00

TUE (4/24)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 302.15
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.30
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.15
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.81

WED (4/25)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 306.31
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.50
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.63
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.75

THU (4/26)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 292.60
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.73
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3

Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.40
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.31

FRI (4/27)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.13
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.35
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 15.53

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 4/21-4/27/2018

No out: 541
--------------
None on: 409
Runner at first: 72
Runners at first and second: 19
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 6
Runner at second: 20
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 3

One out: 516
------------
None on: 283
Runner at first: 100
Runners at first and second: 38
Runners at first and third: 14
Bases loaded: 13
Runner at second: 43
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 12

Two outs: 514
-------------
None on: 242
Runner at first: 110
Runners at first and second: 40
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 15
Runner at second: 54
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 24

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 2212/9969 (22.19%)
------------
None on: 1663/7121 (23.35%)
Runner at first: 287/1542 (18.61%)
Runners at first and second: 92/408 (22.55%)
Runners at first and third: 28/133 (21.05%)
Bases loaded: 27/126 (21.43%)
Runner at second: 90/487 (18.48%)
Runners at second and third: 15/88 (17.05%)
Runner at third: 10/64 (15.63%)

One out: 2171/9679 (22.43%)
------------
None on: 1244/5220 (23.83%)
Runner at first: 387/1916 (20.20%)
Runners at first and second: 145/691 (20.98%)
Runners at first and third: 59/327 (18.04%)
Bases loaded: 62/270 (22.96%)
Runner at second: 163/751 (21.70%)
Runners at second and third: 58/224 (25.89%)
Runner at third: 53/280 (18.93%)

Two outs: 2252/9416 (23.92%)
-------------
None on: 1060/4174 (25.40%)
Runner at first: 409/1872 (21.85%)
Runners at first and second: 212/878 (24.15%)
Runners at first and third: 94/400 (23.50%)
Bases loaded: 82/327 (25.08%)
Runner at second: 234/1059 (22.10%)
Runners at second and third: 75/293 (25.60%)
Runner at third: 86/413 (20.82%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Apr 29, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0070.  Jeff Passan sport writer
Thursday, May 03, 2018

     I will gladly sent the Research Begins disk to:

5314 W. 79th Terrace
Prairie Village, KS 66208
816.808.2424

     To not prevent elbow curveball/sliders injuries, pitchers will release over the Index finger.

     To prevent elbow curveballs/sliders injuries, pitchers must release under the Middle finger.

     The twelve injury experts consist eight Orthopedic surgeons, two athelete trainers, one biomechanical and one Medical doctor.

     If the eight orthopedic surgeons, two exercise trainers and one biomechanical voting against me, I will not get the 'Grant' and curveball/sliders will remain injured.

     I am the only major league pitcher that was able to pitch every day.

     I want all major league pitchers to be able to pitch every day.

     To prevent Ulnar Collateral Ligament injuries, pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     Please help me.

     Sincerely,

Mike


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0071.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 4/28-5/4/2018

SAT (4/28)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.81
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.50
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.19
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.27

SUN (4/29)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.75
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.53
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.69

MON (4/30)--11 games
Average number of pitches per game: 295.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.09
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.45
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.13

TUE (5/1)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 291.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.41
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.13
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 14.95

WED (5/2)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 284.07
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.84
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 23.17

THU (5/3)--11 games
Average number of pitches per game: 300.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.88
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.73
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.03

FRI (5/4)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.53
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.85
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 23.86

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 4/28-5/4/2018

No out: 564
--------------
None on: 408
Runner at first: 77
Runners at first and second: 20
Runners at first and third: 6
Bases loaded: 9
Runner at second: 29
Runners at second and third: 9
Runner at third: 6

One out: 507
------------
None on: 296
Runner at first: 84
Runners at first and second: 37
Runners at first and third: 15
Bases loaded: 11
Runner at second: 43
Runners at second and third: 11
Runner at third: 10

Two outs: 578
-------------
None on: 258

Runner at first: 109
Runners at first and second: 50
Runners at first and third: 25
Bases loaded: 17
Runner at second: 67
Runners at second and third: 24
Runner at third: 28

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 2776/12555 (22.11%)
------------
None on: 2071/8971 (23.09%)
Runner at first: 364/1934 (18.82%)
Runners at first and second: 112/513 (21.83%)
Runners at first and third: 34/164 (20.73%)
Bases loaded: 36/157 (22.93%)
Runner at second: 119/616 (19.32%)
Runners at second and third: 24/116 (20.69%)
Runner at third: 16/84 (19.05%)

One out: 2678/12214 (21.93%)
------------
None on: 1540/6581 (23.40%)
Runner at first: 471/2411 (19.54%)
Runners at first and second: 182/872 (20.87%)
Runners at first and third: 74/407 (18.18%)
Bases loaded: 73/328 (22.26%)
Runner at second: 206/978 (21.06%)
Runners at second and third: 69/285 (24.21%)
Runner at third: 63/352 (17.90%)

Two outs: 2830/11828 (23.93%)
-------------
None on: 1318/5238 (25.16%)
Runner at first: 518/2336 (22.18%)
Runners at first and second: 262/1094 (23.95%)
Runners at first and third: 119/513 (23.20%)
Bases loaded: 99/408 (24.26%)
Runner at second: 301/1339 (22.48%)
Runners at second and third: 99/382 (25.92%)
Runner at third: 114/518 (22.01%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, May 06, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0072.  SUPINATE/PRONATE

The more I supinate at the top of my pendulum swing (in fact, supinate to the maximum extent as if "holding a pie"), I observe the following:

(1) A more straight drive line as opposed to curvilinear pulling;
(2) faster arm speed;
(3) Better, faster and more complete pronation & "stick" as my more arm "corkscrews" straight to target;
(4) better accuracy;
(5) more velocity and pitch movement.

Thoughts?

Thanks!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

01. When you throw True Screwballs, you leave the palm of the hand facing away and rotate the upper arm inwardly.
02. When you throw Torque Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces away from the glove side.
03. When you throw Maxline Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces toward the pitching hand.
04. When your throw Pronation Curves, you turn the palm of the hand faces down.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     Get an Internet Explorer for Google and write: "YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

     Five disks pop-up.

01. Marshall Pitching Motion.
02. James Jeffrey Sparks.
03. Biomechanical Flaws.
04. Injurious Flaws.
05. Research Begins.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0073.  Hi Jeff Passan, sportwriter

     Please help me and all pitchers.

     If the eight orthopedic surgeons, two athletic trainers and one biomechanical vote against me, all pitchers will never prevent elbow injuries.

     I am the only major league pitcher that pitched every day.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0074.  Did you get the five minute disk?

So explain to me what I can do, Doc?

This committee ... I can't exactly lobby them, right?

You're looking for funding for your research, are you not?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     You are a sportswriter.

     You have more power than any of the 12 injury experts.

     When the pitchers throw curveballs and sliders, they either release their the baseball over the Index finger or under the Middle finger.

     When pitchers release the curveballs/sliders over the top of Index finger, they bang the olecranon process against the olecranon fossa.

     When pitchers release the curveballs/sliders under the bottom of the Middle finger, the Pronator Teres prevents the olecranon process from the olecranon fossa.

     If you watch the five minute disk, you can learn how to pronate the forearm.

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     Get an Internet Explorer for Google and write: "YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's "Research Begins"

     I watched pitchers throwing curveballs/sliders over the Index finger and one that that under the Middle finger. The Middle finger curveballs/sliders moved down three times as fast.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0075.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 5/4-5/11/2018

SAT (5/5)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 306.67
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.61
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 31.43

SUN (5/6)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 301.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.37
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.73
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 13.86

MON (5/7)--7 games
Average number of pitches per game: 300.71
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.11
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.14
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 30.56

TUE (5/8)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 297.40
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.52
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.86

WED (5/9)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 297.57
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.73
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.14
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.91

THU (5/10)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 300.90
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.62
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.90
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.09

FRI (5/11)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 316.43
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.30
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.14
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 19.00

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 5/5-5/11/2018

No out: 530
--------------
None on: 359
Runner at first: 103
Runners at first and second: 19
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 3
Runner at second: 19
Runners at second and third: 6
Runner at third: 5

One out: 509
------------
None on: 290
Runner at first: 106
Runners at first and second: 40
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 12
Runner at second: 36
Runners at second and third: 8
Runner at third: 9

Two outs: 518
-------------
None on: 254
Runner at first: 94
Runners at first and second: 51
Runners at first and third: 12
Bases loaded: 15
Runner at second: 56
Runners at second and third: 16
Runner at third: 20

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018
No outs: 3306/15010 (22.03%)
------------
None on: 2430/10686 (22.74%)
Runner at first: 467/2349 (19.88%)
Runners at first and second: 131/600 (21.83%)
Runners at first and third: 50/205 (24.39%)
Bases loaded: 39/178 (21.91%)
Runner at second: 138/746 (18.50%)
Runners at second and third: 30/141 (21.28%)
Runner at third: 21/105 (20.00%)

One out: 3187/14497 (21.98%)
------------
None on: 1830/7786 (23.50%)
Runner at first: 577/2898 (19.91%)
Runners at first and second: 222/1040 (21.35%)
Runners at first and third: 82/481 (17.05%)
Bases loaded: 85/377 (22.55%)
Runner at second: 242/1146 (21.12%)
Runners at second and third: 77/342 (22.51%)
Runner at third: 72/427 (16.86%)

Two outs: 3348/14016 (23.89%)
-------------
None on: 1572/6217 (25.29%)
Runner at first: 612/2799 (21.86%)
Runners at first and second: 313/1309 (23.91%)
Runners at first and third: 131/586 (22.35%)
Bases loaded: 114/478 (23.85%)
Runner at second: 357/1576 (22.65%)
Runners at second and third: 115/444 (25.90%)
Runner at third: 114/607 (18.78%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, May 13, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0076.  Kudos to the writer of Question #072

We can’t ever stop questioning what you write.

The writer has looked into going back to the way you taught Tommy John and many others to end their pendulum swing (in the pie holder motion)

I’ve also been revisiting this as well.

The “problem” I see with ending the pendulum swing with the palm facing away is, as the writer suggests, the Humerus bone has not completely outwardly rotated.

With the pie holder finish to the preparation phase the Humerus bone does completely outwardly rotate.

I believe you nixed this finish because it caused your pitchers to bring their pitching arm beyond their Acromial line.

The biggest issue I see with your pitching motion is pitchers immediately bending their elbow once the glove foot lands.

It seems counter intuitive, but I wonder if ending in the pie holder finish would cure this flaw.

I hope the gentleman keeps you posted on his results.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Pitchers must never supinate forearms.

01. When you throw Maxline True Screwballs, you leave the palm of the hand facing away and rotate the upper arm inwardly.
02. When you throw Torque Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces away from the glove side.
03. When you throw Maxline Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces toward the pitching hand.
04. When your throw Maxline Pronation Curves, you turn the palm of the hand faces down.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0077.  Good information for all baseball pitchers.
Monday, May 14, 2018

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Marshall Pitching Motion.

01. One disk pops-up.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's Research Begins

     Four disks pop-up.

02. James Jeffrey Sparks.
03. Biomechanical Flaws.
04. Injurious Flaws.
05. Research Begins.

     During the five-minute Research Begins disk, you will see me demonstrating curveballs with the Thumb aiming upward and the Thumb pointing downward. When I say that 'hurts,' pitchers injure the elbow and when pitchers do not hurt injure the elbow.

     For 150 years, pitchers that thrown curveballs that injure the elbow or backs.

     These are what pitchers that must be taught.

01. Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

02. To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

03. To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     I need you to help eliminate the 150 years of throwing curves injure elbows.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0078.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 5/12-5/18/2018

SAT (5/12)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 307.75
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.47
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.19
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 23.48

SUN (5/13)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 304.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.38
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 28.41

MON (5/14)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 278.11
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.74
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.78
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.15

TUE (5/15)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 275.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.87
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.00

WED (5/16)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 288.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.28
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.23
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 16.05

THU (5/17)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 303.56
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.56
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.44
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.14

FRI (5/18)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 297.79
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.88
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.64
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 29.11

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 5/12-5/18/2018

No out: 479
--------------
None on: 354
Runner at first: 66
Runners at first and second: 25
Runners at first and third: 3
Bases loaded: 5
Runner at second: 18
Runners at second and third: 8
Runner at third: 0

One out: 505
------------
None on: 269
Runner at first: 98
Runners at first and second: 40
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 15
Runner at second: 48
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 14

Two outs: 507
-------------
None on: 238
Runner at first: 104
Runners at first and second: 46
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 18
Runner at second: 54
Runners at second and third: 14
Runner at third: 17

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 3785/17353 (21.81%)
------------
None on: 2784/12360 (22.52)
Runner at first: 533/2717 (19.62%)
Runners at first and second: 156/693 (22.51%)
Runners at first and third: 53/231 (22.94%)
Bases loaded: 44/191 (23.04%)
Runner at second: 156/875 (17.83)
Runners at second and third: 38/172 (22.09%)
Runner at third: 21/114 (18.42%)

One out: 3692/16762 (22.03%)
------------
None on: 2099/8996 (23.33%)
Runner at first: 675/3340 (20.21%)
Runners at first and second: 262/1205 (21.74%)
Runners at first and third: 90/539 (16.70%)
Bases loaded: 100/434 (23.04%)
Runner at second: 290/1360 (21.32%)
Runners at second and third: 90/407 (22.11%)
Runner at third: 86/481 (17.88%)

Two outs: 3855/16224 (23.76%)
-------------
None on: 1810/7174 (25.23%)
Runner at first: 716/3250 (22.03%)
Runners at first and second: 359/1512 (23.74%)
Runners at first and third: 147/672 (21.88%)
Bases loaded: 132/557 (23.70%)
Runner at second: 411/1837 (22.37%)
Runners at second and third: 129/513 (25.15%)
Runner at third: 151/709 (21.30%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, May 20, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 0079.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

When are you going to hear back from the committee.

And I assume this is a research grant.

What, particularly, are you planning on researching, and what is the hypothesis you're hoping to prove?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Dr. Green said that the 12 injury experts will make a decision in the middle of July.

     If they take a vote, the eight orthopedic surgeons, two athletic trainers and one biomechanic, 11 will vote against me.

     The orthopedic surgeons will bang the olecranon process against the olecranon fossa.

     I am hoping that the orthopedic surgeons have to use the Metal Absolute +Axis Goniometer.

     When pitchers throw curveballs, they release either their baseball over the Index finger or under the Middle finger.

     Over the Index finger technique destroys the elbow.

     Under the Middle finger technique does not injure the elbow.

     The five minute video shows to the thumb up technique and the thumb down technique.

     I saw a pitcher that throws curveballs with his thumb down technique and batters cannot hit the baseball.

     You may be able to find that pitcher where the trail shows the spins, like golfers hit the ball.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0080.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

Right, but is this grant you're seeking for a specific experiment?

If so, what is that experiment?

Is your hypothesis that the middle-finger curveball technique keeps elbows healthy?

And if so, how do you plan on proving this?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I do not want the 'Grant.'

     General Managers must learn how orthopedic surgeons use Goniometers.

     The Middle finger curveball points downward, spins the baseball 33 time and keeps the elbows healthy.

     The Index finger curveball points upward, spins the baseball 12 times and injures the elbows.

     I am the only Middle finger curveball with the front foot pitching motion.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0081.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

I'm sorry, Doc.

I'm just confused with what you're trying to do here.

There's a 12-person board.

You believe 11 of them are going to reject you.

But for what?

What's at stake?

What does the board have to do with middle-finger-released curveballs? 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     What is at stake is destroying Index finger curveballs elbows and learning the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     For more information, please Google.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Marshall Pitching Motion.

01. One disk.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's Research Begins

02. Use two disks.

     a. James Jeffrey Sparks: (A great display quality pitches.)
     b. Research Begins: (Shows how pitchers release curveballs with both Index fingers and Middle fingers.)

     I do believe that 11 of the board will reject me.

     General Managers need for their orthopedic surgeons to use goniometers now.

     Goniometers are easy to use.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0082.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

What are they rejecting?

That’s my confusion.

And what do you want the surgeons to do with the goniometers?

Are you certain they don’t use them now?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     If you read the attaches, you will learn that orthopedic surgeons do not know what to do with lost range of motion.

     Orthopedic surgeons want to make money.

     General Managers let orthopedic surgeons to do unnecessary surgery.

     Goniometers show the damage done.

     In 1967, I found that I had lost 24 degrees range of motion.

     I learned to release the curveballs under the bottom of the Middle finger.

     The Pronator Teres prevents the olecranon process from banging into the olecranon fossa.

     Pitchers the release the curveballs over the top of the Index finger destroys the elbow.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0083.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

We are on email 10 and I still don’t understand your relationship with this board.

Every pitcher has his ROM measured, Doc.

This is standard in a spring physical.

What are they rejecting!?!

Please just answer that simple question.

Did you seek a grant?

Want to do a study?

Or is it just a rejection of the middle-finger curveball theory?

I’ve asked a number of pitchers — including one who blew his UCL — and they all have middle-finger releases.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     How does every pitcher measure the range of motion?

     Does every orthopedic surgeon have a goniometer?

     When pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base, the Pronator Teres prevents the Ulnar Collateral Ligament from tearing.

     The Ulnar Collateral Ligament tears when pitchers have the palm of the hand behind his body and bounces it upward and rebound it.

     I reject pitchers that release their curveballs over the top of the Index finger and destroy their elbows.

     I don't believe that all pitchers release their curveballs under the Middle finger.

     Pitchers that release the under the Middle finger for fastballs, screwballs change-up, knuckle-balls, and every other type of pitch, but not with curveballs.

     I wrote a great 'Grant,' but I don't believe orthopedic surgeons will let me teach pitchers.

     If so, they don't know how to keep the elbow safe.

     No pitchers blow their Ulnar Collateral Ligament when they use the under the Middle finger curveball release.

     I don't need a study, I pitched in 106 games, 208 1/3 innings, 13 consecutive games, pitch batting practice on days that I did not pitch and I earned fourth second, first, fifth and seventh Cy Youngs.

     I can teach the Marshall Pitching Motion to every pitcher.

     I would love to talk with these people.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0084.  Have you watched the five-minute disk?

All of the top orthopedic surgeons have goniometers, yes.

And even some of the lesser-well-known ones, I've seen do.

Honestly, I haven't met a single surgeon or staff that doesn't use a goniometer to measure ROM.

They're commonplace these days.

I'd love to help you. I really would.

But I'm not sure how exactly to do so.

In order to prove your hypothesis about the middle-finger curveball release, you need data to support it.

You know that!

I'm not doubting your hypothesis.

The maxline pronation curve is a hard pitch to throw, though, and in order to prove your point, doing a study would be helpful.

So I'd suggest that rather than framing this all around health, you do a study on the curve and compare its performance to other grips of curveballs.

If it does have greater drop and spin than typical ones, people are going to see that and start throwing it.

That seems to me the most practical way to get yourself into this world -- not by screaming how everyone is wrong, but by using data to prove why you're right.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I am pleased that orthopedic surgeons have goniometers, but do they know how to use it.

     If the Ranges of Motions are not equal with Non-Dominant Arms (Glove Arms) and the Dominant Arm (Pitching Arm), then the Index finger curveballs are destroying their elbows.

     If pitchers release their curveballs under the bottom of the Middle finger, then they are not banging the elbows.

     I believe that only a handful of pitchers are able to throw my Maxline Pronation Curve.

     I pitched curveballs in 106 games, 208 1/3 innings, 13 consecutive games, pitch batting practice on days that I did not pitch, I earned fourth second, first, fifth and seventh Cy Young's and never injured my elbow.

     I can teach the Marshall Pitching Motion to every pitcher.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0085.  Non-dominant arms and dominant arms

     The orthopedic surgeons only measure the pitching arm.

     Now, the orthopedic surgeons have to measure the glove arm as well.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 0086.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 5/12-5/18/2018

SAT (5/19)--17 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.47
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.4
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.18
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 28.57

SUN (5/20)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 291.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.51
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.05

MON (5/21)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 271.56
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.67
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 4.78
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.93

TUE (5/22)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 285.60
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.29
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.07
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 13.87

WED (5/23)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 297.87
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.43
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.67

THU (5/24)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 280.50
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.91
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.25
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 42.86

FRI (5/25)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 282.07
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.09
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 14.77

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 5/19-25/2018

No out: 521
-------------- None on: 402
Runner at first: 63
Runners at first and second: 8
Runners at first and third: 4
Bases loaded: 3
Runner at second: 31
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 6

One out: 527
------------
None on: 329
Runner at first: 87
Runners at first and second: 29
Runners at first and third: 15
Bases loaded: 9
Runner at second: 38
Runner at third: 8

Two outs: 543
-------------
None on: 273
Runner at first: 100
Runners at first and second: 49
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 10
Runner at second: 45
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 37

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs:4306/19710 (21.85%)
------------
None on: 3186/14092 (22.61%)
Runner at first: 596/3066 (19.44%)
Runners at first and second: 164/774 (21.19%)
Runners at first and third: 57/261 (21.84%)
Bases loaded: 47/209 (22.49%)
Runner at second: 187/983 (19.02%)
Runners at second and third: 42/194 (21.65%)
Runner at third: 27/132 (20.45%)

One out: 4219/19094 (22.10%)
------------
None on: 2428/10322 (23.52%)
Runner at first: 762/3792 (20.09%)
Runners at first and second: 291/1342 (21.68%)
Runners at first and third: 105/601 (17.47%)
Bases loaded: 109/487 (22.38%)
Runner at second: 328/1533 (21.40%)
Runners at second and third: 102/466 (21.89%)
Runner at third: 94/551 (17.06%)

Two outs: 4398/18460 (23.82%)
-------------
None on: 2083/8216 (25.35%)
Runner at first: 816/3707 (22.01%)
Runners at first and second: 408/1703 (23.96%)
Runners at first and third: 163/753 (21.65%)
Bases loaded: 142/622 (22.83%)
Runner at second: 456/2068 (22.05%)
Runners at second and third: 142/566 (25.09%)
Runner at third: 188/825 (22.79%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Mar 27, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

0087.  Research Study

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In regard to the exchange, you had with the individual that wanted to know the purpose of your research study.

I hope that person wasn’t who I think he was, but he made the point that all his MLB pitching friends release their curve ball off their middle finger.

What you should have done is challenged him to show even one MLB pitcher that releases his curve off his middle finger.

I’m very confident he can not produce one.

Basically, all you are trying to do is check the range of motion of the pitching arm vs the non-pitching arm.

If the pitching arm has lost ROM, then you have proven there is a problem with some particular aspect of pitching.

Nothing else.

But, it’s a start.

Didn’t you show this individual the ROM you lost in your pitching arm.

I couldn’t believe it when I saw it.

The problem is, as I told you when you started this venture, MLB has no interest in stopping these injuries.

And to even go down this road with surgeons doing the voting was ridiculous.

But I’ve changed my opinion on this a bit because like with the priest abuse scandal when the story is told of what’s been done to these unfortunate young pitchers your attempt to do this simple study will be just one of many pieces of evidence against all these gentleman who will say they are shocked SHOCKED all these injuries could have been prevented.

I don’t know if the questioner knows that MLB surgeons look at bone chips as a cost of doing business.

I saw an image of a Tommy John recipient’s elbow and I asked him about the bone chips in his elbow the picture showed.

This was before the surgery and the surgeon said they were bone chips and every pitcher has them.

The surgeon did not bother to take them out.

So why do they want to approve a research study that proves what they already know?

If they approve your study it puts them in a position that they would have to look into a solution.

Once they go down that road they can envision a baseball game without elbow injuries.

Do you really think surgeons are going to vote for that?

The only thing these guys understand is money.

You have to perhaps find a lawyer to initiate a class action law suit.

That will be easy money for that lawyer.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     You wrote: "Basically, all you are trying to do is check the range of motion of the pitching arm vs the non-pitching arm."

     Non-dominant arms and dominant arms.

     The orthopedic surgeons only measure the pitching arm.

     Now, the orthopedic surgeons have to measure the glove arm as well.

     Orthopedic surgeons are idiots.

     I hope that Dr. Gary Green is not an idiot.

     Charlie Morton is not an idiot and another pitcher I saw released his curveballs under the Middle finger.

     If I can get Charlie Morton to teach the other Astros pitchers to release their curveballs under their Middle finger, then the Astros pitchers will follow.

     Then, if Charlie Morton learns my screwball, the he will able to pitch every Sunday and Wednesday and win thirty of the fifty games.

     Then, pitchers will not have pain.

     I am happy that you read my stuff.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0088.  Charlie Morton and more

     Since I last talked, Charlie Morton and at least two more Astros pitchers have released their curveballs under their Middle finger for three times their spins and no damage to their elbow.

     At this rate, all Astros pitchers will release their curveballs under the Middle finger.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0089.  What happened?

I just checked his spin this year, Doc, and it's been pretty consistent all season, around 2,900 RPM.

Last year, it was 2,875 RPM.

I don't think anything has changed -- at least not the spin rate on it.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When pitchers release the curveballs over the top of Index finger, they bang the olecranon process against the olecranon fossa.

     When the curveballs spin comes from over the top of their Index finger, the baseball moves upward.

     When pitchers release the curveballs under the bottom of the Middle finger, the Pronator Teres prevents the olecranon process from the olecranon fossa.

     When the curveballs spin comes from under the bottom of their Middle finger, the baseball moves downward.

     They may have similar RPMs, but the baseball moves differently.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0090.  volleyball players

I went to a clinic in which you participated some time ago in Naperville, Illinois.

I wish I had a 100th of your knowledge or insight.

You were easily the most controversial but also the most fascinating and informational speaker there.

I know you understand the throwing motion for pitchers and outfielders, but I was curious if you ever looked at volleyball players as far as hitting and serving motions.

I don't know if there are a lot of injuries but now since boys and girls are playing it in high school, club, college, that it has become a big thing.

If you have any insight on the volleyball players approach or servers approach, or know of someone that has done studies that you approve of, I would like to hear about it.

I am hoping some day that baseball really does grasp what you have been saying and change things.

They have started getting better with the pitch count but to my knowledge, they are not teaching the Mike Marshall way of pitching.

Again, I want to thank you for being there for all the players that believe or want to change.

P.S.: I am a big track and field guy but also like watching baseball.

Love your passion.

They need more guys like you in a lot of the sports.

Steven C. Gasser MS, ACSM RCEP, CSCS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Volleyball servers, tennis servers and Marshall Pitching Motion should use the same technique.

     When I pitched baseballs, I made sure that the heel of the front foot contacted the ground and the rear foot never left the rubber.

     With the rear foot off the ground and not landing until the my acromial line pointed at the home plate, I got my body well ahead of the rear foot.

     Tennis servers and volleyball servers used the same technique.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0091.  Similar RPMs, but the baseball moves differently

Spin this year has been pretty consistent all season (2,900 RPM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When the curveballs spin comes from over the top of their Index finger, the curveballs move upward, returns to its height and finally some lazy downward.

     When the curveballs spin comes from under the bottom of their Middle finger, the curveballs move downward, fast downward and out-of-sight downward.

     Therefore, Middle finger curveballs get three times of the downward movement.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0092.  Hitters in the American League West don't get much of a break when it comes to facing dominating pitching.

Houston, TX: May 03, 2018

Charlie Morton, Justin Verlander and Dallas Keuchel have worked in Houston.

The middle finger applies tremendous pressure on its seam, the nail and the red-hot Houston Astros are in the forefront of the revolution in pitching.

So, step to the plate if you dare for a breakdown of the best pitch thrown by a pitcher on each team in the AL West and how they taunt opposing hitters with them.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0093.  Pine tar

The seam height of Major League baseballs is, relatively speaking, very low.

This makes it more difficult to grip and spin the baseball.

It is being alleged that pitchers are using pine tar (which is against the rules) to get a better grip and spin on baseballs.

Do you know how much more effective it would be to throw your Maxline Pronation curve and Maxline Fastball pitches if your pitchers used pine tar?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     It is best when pitchers throw curveballs and screwballs, holding the baseball tightly your Middle finger and the third finger.

     Resin can help as well.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0095.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 5/26-6/1/2018

SAT (5/26)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 295.53
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.36
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.73
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.73

SUN (5/27)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.13
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.06
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.53
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.43

MON (5/28)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 294.19
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.23
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.25
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 31.00

TUE (5/29)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 310.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.85
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.60
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.54

WED (5/30)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 287.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.54
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.93
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 23.60

THU (5/31)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.90
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.82
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.10
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.87

FRI (6/1)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 292.87
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.27
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.20
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.73

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------    

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 5/26-6/1/2018

No out: 532
--------------  None on: 368
Runner at first: 99
Runners at first and second: 20
Runners at first and third: 3
Bases loaded: 13
Runner at second: 19
Runners at second and third: 5
Runner at third: 5

One out: 518
------------
None on: 288
Runner at first: 93
Runners at first and second: 37
Runners at first and third: 11
Bases loaded: 16
Runner at second: 50
Runners at second and third: 8
Runner at third: 15

Two outs: 562
-------------
None on: 265
Runner at first: 98
Runners at first and second: 58
Runners at first and third: 20
Bases loaded: 21
Runner at second: 55
Runners at second and third: 22
Runner at third: 23

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------    

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 4838/22448 (21.55%)
------------
None on: 3554/16010 (22.20%)
Runner at first: 695/3521 (19.74%)
Runners at first and second: 184/890 (20.67%)
Runners at first and third: 60/294 (20.41%)
Bases loaded: 60/245 (24.49%)
Runner at second: 206/1110 (18.56%)
Runners at second and third: 47/222 (21.17%)
Runner at third: 32/156 (20.51%)

One out: 4737/21646 (21.88%)
------------
None on: 2716/11670 (23.27%)
Runner at first: 855/4297 (19.90%)
Runners at first and second: 328/1517 (21.62%)
Runners at first and third: 116/678 (17.11%)
Bases loaded: 125/570 (21.93%)
Runner at second: 378/1761 (21.47%)
Runners at second and third: 110/527 (20.87%)
Runner at third: 109/626 (17.41%)

Two outs: 4960/20917 (23.71%)
-------------
None on: 2348/9301 (25.24%)
Runner at first: 914/4184 (21.85%)
Runners at first and second: 466/1928 (24.17%)
Runners at first and third: 183/848 (21.58%)
Bases loaded: 163/707 (23.06%)
Runner at second: 511/2355 (21.70%)
Runners at second and third: 164/647 (25.35%)
Runner at third: 211/947 (22.28%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Jun 10, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 0095.  Lost Curveballs

Charlie Morton did not pitch well last evening as he gave up six runs to the Red Sox in a loss.

I did contact him after we spoke and relayed your comments about his curveball.

Here is his response:

Joe - Oh no, I don’t think that’s true.

I’m just trying to spin it as much as I can.

My mechanics have certainly improved but not the best by a long shot.

He did have seven strikeouts in 5.1 innings last evening, but they were hitting him hard.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When the curveballs spin comes from over the top of their Index finger, the curveballs move upward, returns to its height and finally some lazy downward.

     When the curveballs spin comes from under the bottom of their Middle finger, the curveballs move downward, fast downward and out-of-sight downward.

     Therefore, Middle finger curveballs get three times of the downward movement.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0096.  Charlie Morton

You mentioned in your letters this week that Charlie Morton of the Astros releases his curve ball under his middle finger.

Do you have any visual evidence of this?

I found this video of him throwing a curve ball in slow motion. Is he releasing his curve ball under his middle finger?

It does not look like if to me.

I see pretty significant flyout.

Charlie Morton lost his curveballs

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     When Charlie Morton throws the curveballs from over the top of their Index finger, the curveballs move up, returns to its height and ends with lazy down movement.

     When Charlie Morton throws the curveballs from under the bottom of their Middle finger, the curveballs move from the highest height, moves fast downward and out-of-sight downward.

     Therefore, Middle finger curveballs get three times of the downward movement.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0097.  Watch "Con" on YouTube

I was hoping you could give me so feedback on my 10 year olds pronation.

I was only able to pick up on this after videotaping him on an app and watching him in slow motion.

I have had many say this is wrong and recently started learning about pronation and ran across your website.

So people are also telling me pronation is good, but he is starting to early when pronating his arm.

So confused.

I would love to speak on the phone with you if possible.

By the way, he did this all on his own so it is his natural throwing movement.

Clip is below.

Bad body action

Thanks

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Pronation is the key to best pitches.

     However, the young man stands with his rear foot parallel with the rubber and you raise his front foot.

     This young man should stand with his rear foot forty-five degrees to the rubber.

     Whether wind-up or set position, this young man needs to step forward with his front foot and when the heel of the front foot contacts the ground, this young man needs to moves the rear knee diagonally across the knee of the rear foot.

     Here is some good information for all baseball pitchers.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Marshall Pitching Motion.

01. One disk pops-ups.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's Research Begins

02. Two disks pop-ups.

     a. James Jeffrey Sparks.
     b. Research Begins.

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0098.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 6/2-6/8/2018

SAT (6/2)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 312.55
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.51
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.13
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.65

SUN (6/3)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 282.64
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.22
Average number of innings per starter: Exactly 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.14
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.44

MON (6/4)--5 games
Average number of pitches per game: 312.60
Average number of pitches per half inning: 18.17
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.20
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.58

TUE (6/5)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 281.25
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.96
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.56
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 16.85

WED (6/6)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 313.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.37
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.32

THU (6/7)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.70
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.63
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3 
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.30
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.63

FRI (6/8)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 285.87
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.06
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 31.71

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------     

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 6/2-8/2018

No out: 495
--------------
  None on: 379
Runner at first: 49
Runners at first and second: 24
Runners at first and third: 9
Bases loaded: 1
Runner at second: 28
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 1

One out: 499
------------
None on: 304
Runner at first: 79
Runners at first and second: 37
Runners at first and third: 10
Bases loaded: 10
Runner at second: 37
Runners at second and third: 8
Runner at third: 14

Two outs: 549
-------------
None on: 262
Runner at first: 95
Runners at first and second: 57
Runners at first and third: 13
Bases loaded: 23
Runner at second: 52
Runners at second and third: 17
Runner at third: 30

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------     

Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 5333/24749 (21.55%)
------------
None on: 3933/17714 (22.20%)
Runner at first: 744/3832 (19.42%)
Runners at first and second: 208/979 (21.25%)
Runners at first and third: 69/334 (20.66%)
Bases loaded: 61/260 (23.46%)
Runner at second: 234/1219 (19.20%)
Runners at second and third: 51/237 (21.52%)
Runner at third: 33/174 (18.97%)

One out: 5236/23884 (21.92%)
------------
None on: 3020/12969 (23.29%)
Runner at first: 934/4687 (19.93%)
Runners at first and second: 365/1672 (21.83%)
Runners at first and third: 126/739 (17.05%)
Bases loaded: 135/608 (22.20%)
Runner at second: 415/1948 (21.30%)
Runners at second and third: 118/574 (20.56%)
Runner at third: 123/687 (17.90%)

Two outs: 5509/23130 (23.82%)
-------------
None on: 2610/10354 (25.21%)
Runner at first: 1009/4617 (21.85%)
Runners at first and second: 523/2118 (24.69%)
Runners at first and third: 196/920 (21.30%)
Bases loaded: 186/771 (24.12%)
Runner at second: 563/2596 (21.69%)
Runners at second and third: 181/705 (25.67%)
Runner at third: 241/1049 (22.97%)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Jun 10, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 0099.  Charlie Morton fastball

You have seen Charlie Morton release a curve ball under his middle finger?

So you must have seen him throw his fastball.

His fastball has gone from 92-99 MPH since joining the Astros.

What change did he make to his mechanics to get this velocity increase so late in his career?

It looked to me like he might be staying slightly taller and it also looked to me that he is landing more closed now.

Even if I am correct, I can’t see that type of velocity increase coming from those changes.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     I saw Charlie Morton release the curveballs under the Middle finger with great downward movement.

     After seven games, I saw Charlie Morton release the Curveballs over the top Index finger with little downward movement.

     I did not watch Charlie Morton's fastball.

     The only way to increase fastballs is to use the Marshall Pitching Motion with upper arm pointing at down the acromial line and the late elastic 'horizontal rebound' forearm working.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0100.  The other arm

Yes, Glenn Fleisig put me in touch with Don Mueller too.

The latter accused me of spouting fanatical nonsense.

Whatever you and I have to say and whether we agree or not, neither of us is doing any such thing.

I have carefully reviewed a goodly amount of what Mueller has to say.

I'm afraid his doctorate in physics has availed him little.

All the best

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     You are correct, Dr. Fleisig spouts fanatical nonsense.

     Thirty years of research and Dr. Fleisig still has done anything.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0101.  Destroying the Elbow

In 2009, Mike Rizzo became the Nationals’ general manager. Stan Kasten asked Mr. Rizzo to talk to Dr. Mike Marshall. We talked for an hour. I told Mr. Rizzo to never allow orthopedic surgeons to enter the clubhouse. Mr. Rizzo said that we would meet. But, Mr. Rizzo never called me.

When I had an opportunity for the ‘Grant,’ I started to talk with reporters. These comments come from dozens of different baseball people.

Eight orthopedic surgeons, two athletic trainers, one biomechanical and one Medical doctor make twelve injury experts. If the eight orthopedic surgeons, two athletic trainers and one biomechanical vote against me, all pitchers will never prevent elbow injuries. Rather than framing this all around health you do, study on the curve and compare its performance to other grips of curveballs. The most practical way to get yourself into this world is not by screaming how everyone is wrong, but by using data to prove why you're right.

All of the top orthopedic surgeons have goniometers. What do you want the surgeons to do with the goniometers? Goniometers show the damage done. Orthopedic surgeons have goniometers, but do they know how to use it. Orthopedic surgeons only measure the pitching arm. Orthopedic surgeons have to measure the glove arm as well. Even some of the lesser-well-known orthopedic surgeons have seen some.

If the Ranges Of Motions (ROM) are not equal with Non-Dominant Arms (Glove Arms) and the Dominant Arm (Pitching Arm), then the Index finger curveballs are destroying their elbows. Dr. Gary Green M.D. knows how the eight orthopedic surgeons use the Metal Absolute + Axis Goniometers Digital 180 Degree Range 9 inch Arm Manual. Every pitcher has his ROM measured. I haven't met a single surgeon or staff that doesn't use a goniometer to measure ROM.

The maxline pronation curve is a hard pitch to throw and in order to prove the point, doing a study would be helpful. Only a handful of pitchers are able to throw my Maxline Pronation Curve. If pitchers release their curveballs under the bottom of the Middle finger, then they are not banging the elbows. Baseball pitchers that throw curveballs release the baseball over the top of the Index finger that destroys their elbows.

If the curveballs have greater drop and spin than typical ones, people are going to see that and start throwing it. There is no doubt that Dr. Marshall has the expertise in this area, but that alone is not a fundable project.


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0102.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 6/9-6/15/2018

SAT (6/9)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 304.73
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.68
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.67
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.00

SUN (6/10)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 291.07
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.60
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.80
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.29
MON (6/11)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.63
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.93
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.25
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 18.97

TUE (6/12)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 291.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.71
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.40
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 19.79

WED (6/13)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.33
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.48
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.62

THU (6/14)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.58
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6 1/3 
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.33
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.92

FRI (6/15)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 295.87
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.87
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.11

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 6/9-15/2018

No out: 490
--------------
  None on: 346
Runner at first: 69
Runners at first and second: 18
Runners at first and third: 6
Bases loaded: 3
Runner at second: 31
Runners at second and third: 11
Runner at third: 6

One out: 509
------------
None on: 318
Runner at first: 78
Runners at first and second: 33
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 9
Runner at second: 34
Runners at second and third: 11
Runner at third: 10

Two outs: 550
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None on: 275
Runner at first: 91
Runners at first and second: 46
Runners at first and third: 13
Bases loaded: 21
Runner at second: 59
Runners at second and third: 16
Runner at third: 29

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 5823/27150 (21.45%)
------------
None on: 4279/19444 (22.01%)
Runner at first: 813/4199 (19.36%)
Runners at first and second: 226/1073 (21.06%)
Runners at first and third: 75/362 (20.72%)
Bases loaded: 64/284 (22.54%)
Runner at second: 265/1330 (19.92%)
Runners at second and third: 62/266 (23.31%)
Runner at third: 39/193 (20.21%)

One out: 5745/26198 (21.93%)
------------
None on: 3338/14246 (23.43%)
Runner at first: 1012/5135 (19.71%)
Runners at first and second: 398/1824 (21.82%)
Runners at first and third: 142/813 (17.47%)
Bases loaded: 144/668 (21.56%)
Runner at second: 449/2118 (21.20%)
Runners at second and third: 129/637 (20.25%)
Runner at third: 133/757 (17.57%)

Two outs: 6059/25340 (23.91%)
-------------
None on: 2885/11367 (25.38%)
Runner at first: 1100/5041 (21.82%)
Runners at first and second: 569/2332 (24.40%)
Runners at first and third: 209/993 (21.05%)
Bases loaded: 207/848 (24.41%)
Runner at second: 622/2847 (21.85%)
Runners at second and third: 197/765 (25.75%)
Runner at third: 270/1147 (23.54%)


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     On Sunday, Jun 17, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0103.  Orthopedic Surgery

General rehab is going great.

Do you recommend the 120 day High school training program with 10 lb wrist weights and a 6 pound ball for Tommy John rehabilitation?

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     You did not need the surgery.

     The orthopedic surgeon does not know what he is doing.

     Instead of 30 lbs. of wrist weight and 15 lbs. of lead, you have to use 10 lbs. of wrist weight and 6 lbs. of lead.

     In your first recovery, you have to go through 10 lbs. of wrist weights and 6 lbs. of lead for a year.

     In your second recovery, you have to go through 15 lbs. of wrist weights and 8 lbs. of lead for a year.

     In your third recovery, you have to go through 20 lbs. of wrist weights and 10 lbs. of lead for a year.

     In your fourth recovery, you have to go through 25 lbs. of wrist weights and 12 lbs. of lead for a year.

     In your fifth recovery, you have to go through 30 lbs. of wrist weights and 15 lbs. of lead for a year.


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0104.  Orthopedic Surgery

What intensity do you recommend?

By “2nd year recovery”, do you mean 2nd year?

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     With your heavy training in the last few years, I believe you could train quickly.

     The UCL means nothing.

     The Pronator Teres will keep your pitching arm powerful.

     If you are starting in June, you can train until spring training.


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0105.  The Acid Test

Fun and highly instructive!

Place a tennis ball in your armpit.

Serve.

If the ball drops during the preparatory phase, the motion is sub-optimal.

Why?

Because "the total angular momentum of an isolated system of bodies remains constant"(Asimov), angular velocity can increase only if moment of inertia decreases commensurately.

"Linear velocity is equal to angular velocity times distance from the center of rotation" (again, Asimov).

Call it "elbow in, racquet-head away."

Until someone is able to topple the laws of classical physics, the model stands. Q.E.D.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     To get a great serve, the tennis players must point the tip of the elbow pointing down the acromial line to the center of the strike zone.

     This gives the servers get an upper arm action and the lower arm action

     Only the linear velocity counts.

     "Elbow in, racquet-head away is linear."


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0106.  Orthopedic Surgery

I understand that the ulnar collateral ligament means nothing.

I’m sure I could throw with a full tear only if I pendulum swung my pitching arm correctly and got my pitching side in front of my pitching foot to accelerate my pitching arm with my lat.

I was able to make powerful wrong foot throws “hurt.”

I was not able to pendulum swing it correctly throwing in game competition.

I was more focused on executing your quality pitches to get whiffs.

I would come out of lock and not outwardly rotate my full arm before the acceleration phase.

Therefore, when I started the acceleration phase I was still grabbing with my palm facing the ground giving me far too much of a vertical bounce.

I want to achieve your horizontal bounce.

With enough practice and reps, I will get it right.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     The only way to tear the Ulnar collateral Ligament is to swing the forearm coming to a stop, raise your upper arm straight up and your forearm pointing upward and rebound the forearm backward.

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement toward second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.


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0107.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 6/16-6/22/2018

SAT (6/16)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 278.33
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.94
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 19.51

SUN (6/17)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 305.60
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.04
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.27
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.69

MON (6/18)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 294.10
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.43
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.50
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.00

TUE (6/19)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 302.06
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.14
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.63
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.47

WED (6/20)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.54
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.04
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.38
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 19.28

THU (6/21)--9 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.56
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.05
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.44
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 32.65

FRI (6/22)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 307.19
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.38
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.81
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 18.35

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 6/16-22/2018

No out: 534
--------------
None on: 382
Runner at first: 88
Runners at first and second: 16
Runners at first and third: 7
Bases loaded: 7
Runner at second: 25
Runners at second and third: 3
Runner at third: 6

One out: 560
------------
None on: 329
Runner at first: 96
Runners at first and second: 29
Runners at first and third: 15
Bases loaded: 16
Runner at second: 48
Runners at second and third: 15
Runner at third: 12

Two outs: 516
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None on: 239
Runner at first: 89
Runners at first and second: 46
Runners at first and third: 14
Bases loaded: 24
Runner at second: 59
Runners at second and third: 15
Runner at third: 30

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 6357/29632 (21.45%)
------------
None on: 4661/21198 (21.99%)
Runner at first: 901/4612 (19.54%)
Runners at first and second: 242/1166 (20.75%)
Runners at first and third: 82/394 (20.81%)
Bases loaded: 71/308 (23.05%)
Runner at second: 290/1448 (20.03%)
Runners at second and third: 65/292 (22.26%)
Runner at third: 45/214 (21.03%)

One out: 6350/28550 (22.24%)
------------
None on: 3667/15472 (23.70%)
Runner at first: 1108/5608 (19.76%)
Runners at first and second: 427/1986 (21.50%)
Runners at first and third: 157/889 (17.66%)
Bases loaded: 160/741 (21.59%)
Runner at second: 497/2307 (21.54%)
Runners at second and third: 144/712 (20.22%)
Runner at third: 145/835 (17.37%)

Two outs: 6575/27628 (23.80%)
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None on: 3124/12364 (25.27%)
Runner at first: 1189/5504 (21.60%)
Runners at first and second: 615/2549 (24.13%)
Runners at first and third: 223/1089 (20.48%)
Bases loaded: 231/934 (24.73%)
Runner at second: 681/3107 (21.92%)
Runners at second and third: 212/834 (25.42%)
Runner at third: 300/1247 (24.06%)


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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Jun 24, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0108.  Translational and Rotational

If Dr. Asimov is correct, linear velocity can easily be computed by multiplying angular velocity and distance of object of interest from the axis of rotation. To optimize the product of the two, we must first increase angular velocity by lessening moment of inertia.

Rather like the spinning figure skater, we must draw elbows closer to the torso. That's the "elbows in" part.

To increase the distance of ball/racquet head from the axis of rotation, we must hold ball/racquet head farther away from axis. That's the "ball/racquet head out" part. In practical terms, this means that the interior angle at the elbow must never be less than 90 degrees.

I often make reference to the javelin thrower, who does get a running start, but proceeds to rely upon angular momentum once the stride foot plants. He too achieves 180 degrees of rotation by completion of the task.

Obviously, the acromial line must align with target. However, once the necessity of doing so is granted, what ensues is necessarily an angular action.

We both have long since said goodbye to the traditional throwing/serving model.

What separates us is my insistence that the elbow must remain ahead of/in front of the acromial line from start to finish. Should that elbow drift behind the acromial line, the dominant shoulder must close (internally rotate).

The result?

Object in hand will always draw nearer (???) to the axis of rotation, decreasing linear velocity.

Strange as it may seem, most athletes throw better immediately when they graze the coccyx with knuckles of throwing hand as stride forefoot sets down.

A gentleman of my acquaintance used this approach more than fifty years ago to top 100 mph consistently.

(He had no interest in pursuing a career in professional baseball.)

I often serve starting with racquet behind my back and have students do likewise.

Why?

Doing so naturally defeats the traditional approach and removes all hitches, if such there be.

It's worth adding that I execute all strokes in the game of tennis with wrist radially deviated and dorsiflexed, and throw/hit a baseball the same way.

Absent radial deviation, the forearm cannot abduct in the preparatory phase nor adduct post-release/contact.

Correct:

I mid-supinate dominant hand in prep. phase and mid-pronate in execution phase.

While the traditional throwing/serving model is suspect in many particulars, I see the use of palmar flexion as the probable cause of UCL tears.

Dragging dominant arm across the body (???) may well be the cause of rotator-cuff tears.

Since I do and teach neither, these problems never arise.

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     I am the only major league baseball pitcher that mastered the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games, 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games.

     In 1972, I won the 4th Cy Young.

     In 1973, I won the 2nd Cy Young.

     In 1974, I won the 1st Cy Young.

     In 1977, I won the 5th Cy Young.

     In 1978, I won the 7th Cy Young.

     And, I did this in three different baseball teams.


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0109.  Orthopedic Surgery

I will pendulum swing my pitching arm in one smooth motion.

Guys like Chris Sale, Max Scherzer, and Rick Porcello all fly out a lot.

It seems they go to have a vertical bounce, but then instead of the baseball going up after the bounce, the baseball stays on the same plane as the bounce.

Does this cause the vertical pitching bounce to be less stressful because it’s going sort of into a “side arm tricep extension.”

To put it in other words, there’s no rebound from the bounce, but just extending the elbow.

I also understand there would be a banging in the back of the elbow if they do not pronate correctly before, during, and after release.

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     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and sliders.

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement through second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     Don't forget the 'Horizontal Rebound' where the upper arm aims at home plate and the forearm moves horizontally.


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0110.  This is highly instructive

Because the racquet is moving far too fast for the naked eye to follow, I've devised a way for students to see and feel what happens before, during, and after contact.

Loosely cradle dominant elbow I palm of the other hand, and raise both to about eye level.

When you swing forearm upward and forward, it travels from mid-supinated through contact to mid-pronated without any independent movement of the wrist whatever.

Do the same at chest level or lower, and the action of both ground strokes can be seen and felt.

Like it?

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     Tennis servers aim their upper arm down their acromial line into the target.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games, 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games.

     I mastered the Marshall Pitching Motion by aiming my upper arm down the acromial line into the strike zone.


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0111.  Orthopedic Surgery

Is it necessarily a bad thing to feel like I’m pushing the baseball?

Whenever I show the back of my upper arm towards home plate to try to achieve the horizontal rebound, I feel like I’m pushing the ball instead of slinging it like a whip.

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     Are you practicing the Lid throws?

     That should teach you how to snap the release and the recoil.

     Remember, you started with Lids.


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0112.  Analysis of Javelin Throwing

Clearly visible:

1. Internally rotated (???) dominant shoulder.
2. Frank palmar flexion of non-dominant wrist.
3. Premature commitment of lower body (note belt buckle).
4. Over striding.

A veritable biodynamic nightmare.

The solution has been clear since the first aborigine thought to heave a sharpened stick.

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     The nonsense of baseball pitchers throwing javelins.

     I am the only major league pitcher that pitched 106 games, 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games.

     I mastered the Marshall Pitching Motion by aiming my upper arm down the acromial line into the strike zone.

     In 1972, I won the 4th Cy Young.

     In 1972, I won the 4th Cy Young.

     In 1973, I won the 2nd Cy Young.

     In 1974, I won the 1st Cy Young.

     In 1977, I won the 5th Cy Young.

     In 1978, I won the 7th Cy Young.

     And, I did this in three different baseball teams.

     Glenn Fleisig could not wipe his butt.


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0113.  Orthopedic Surgery

I will start snapping the lids.

When I throw the tip of my pitching elbow up and into face home plate, should I just float into that position and then add the intent to get the whip action of the force couple/recoil?

When you tell me “focus just on the snap,” I just try to throw the baseball right before release.

I save all the intent for the pronation snap and sort of float into all the positions before that in one smooth continuous motion.

When you tell me “you’re rushing,” it finally clicked that I need to wait until my pitching leg is in front of my glove foot while my chest is still bowed back and closed ready to explode.

This position is tough to get in with a long stride.

I felt the power of rotating in front of my glove foot doing a wrong foot stride drill on the mound.

Much easier to engage the lat as well.

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("I save all the intent for the pronation snap and sort of float into all the positions before that in one smooth continuous motion."

) ("When you tell me “you’re rushing,” it finally clicked that I need to wait until my pitching leg is in front of my glove foot while my chest is still bowed back and closed ready to explode."

) ("I felt the power of rotating in front of my glove foot doing a wrong foot stride drill on the mound."

) ("Much easier to engage the lat as well."

)      This is great stuff.

     When the heel of the front foot hits the ground, the knee of the rear foot is moving across the front knee.

     Then, you use the glove arm to move the upper arm behind and the pitching upper arm moves down the acromial line into the strike zone getting into the 'horizontal rebound.'


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0114.  Analysis of Javelin Throwing

I am well aware of your accomplishments on the hill, hence you need not doubt my respect.

In truth, I do not advocate a need for pitchers to hurl javelins.

I do, however, find it interesting that the best javelin throwers can chuck a spear well over 100 yards.

(Surely none would have difficulty throwing "a rope" 60 feet, 6 inches.)

I submit that the basic technique, minus over striding and planting heel first, has merit.

Why?

The javelin thrower necessarily keeps the dominant elbow "ahead of the acromial line."

My research strongly suggests that this is a biodynamic imperative.

Accordingly, I can't apologize for so positioning the elbow, irrespective of what I am swinging or throwing.

Elastic energy is science, not hogwash.

Here, I speak also from personal experience:

I have the arms of a ten-year-old girl, BUT my pectoralis Major is perhaps 50 percent larger than my non dominant.

This is true of my latissimus dorsi as well.

(A chiropractor informed me of same nearly thirty years ago.)

I still swing a racquet every day.

In the strict sense, I do not throw with my arm at all.

Rather, I employ external oblique, pec-, and lat- to impel the arm.

I'm a year younger than you are and still capable of generating considerable velocity.

If not always explicated in your written work and videos, it does seem that you too see pitching as rotational.

Yes, linear velocity is the story, but linear velocity equals angular velocity times distance of ball from axis of rotation.

The point is fundamental, and totally accords with what Wallis and Newton had to say so long ago.

No one doubts that the outside of the Ferris wheel moves faster than does any point closer to the hub.

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     Elastic energy is science, but 'horizontal rebound' works for elastic energy.

     Pectoralis Major is 50 percent larger than my non-dominant, but the te Pectoralis Major barely raises the upper arm.

     I employ external oblique, pec-, and lat- to impel the arm, but Latissimus Dorsi I and II, but they will not raise the upper arm.

     I am the only major league baseball pitcher that mastered the Marshall Pitching Motion.

     In 1974, I pitched in 106 games, 208 1/3 innings and 13 consecutive games.

     In 1972, I won the 4th Cy Young, in 1973, I won the 2nd Cy Young, n 1974, I won the 1st Cy Young, in 1977, I won the 5th Cy Young and in 1978, I won the 7th Cy Young.

     And, I did this in three different baseball teams.

     Biomechanical Glenn Fleisig could not wipe his butt.


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0115.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 6/23-6/29/2018

SAT (6/23)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.53
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.46
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.80
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.45

SUN (6/24)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 281.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.18
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 6
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.33
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.55

MON (6/25)--12 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.71
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.50
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.92

TUE (6/26)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 290.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.46
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.27
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.60

WED (6/27)--14 games
Average number of pitches per game: 287.86
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.18
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.36
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 22.47

THU (6/28)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 294.50
Average number of pitches per half inning: 15.66
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.40

FRI (6/29)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 281.53
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.12
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 5.93
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.22

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 6/23-29/2018

No out: 529
--------------
None on: 404
Runner at first: 62
Runners at first and second: 20
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 2
Runner at second: 15
Runners at second and third: 4
Runner at third: 4

One out: 526
------------
None on: 291
Runner at first: 99
Runners at first and second: 32
Runners at first and third: 14
Bases loaded: 9
Runner at second: 44
Runners at second and third: 21
Runner at third: 16

Two outs: 544
-------------
None on: 249
Runner at first: 110
Runners at first and second: 40
Runners at first and third: 27
Bases loaded: 28
Runner at second: 56
Runners at second and third: 16
Runner at third: 18

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 6876/32180 (21.37%)
------------
None on: 5065/23016 (22.01%)
Runner at first: 963/5011 (19.22%)
Runners at first and second: 262/1272 (20.60%)
Runners at first and third: 90/434 (20.74%)
Bases loaded: 73/339 (21.53%)
Runner at second: 305/1557 (19.59%)
Runners at second and third: 69/321 (21.50%)
Runner at third: 49/230 (21.30%)
One out: 6831/30902 (22.11%)
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None on: 3958/16798 (23.56%)
Runner at first: 1207/6062 (19.91%)
Runners at first and second: 459/2133 (21.52%)
Runners at first and third: 171/965 (17.72%)
Bases loaded: 169/797 (21.20%)
Runner at second: 541/2480 (21.81%)
Runners at second and third: 165/776 (21.26%)
Runner at third: 161/891 (18.07%)

Two outs: 7119/30038 (23.70%)
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None on: 3373/13444 (25.09%)
Runner at first: 1299/5992 (21.68%)
Runners at first and second: 655/2773 (23.62%)
Runners at first and third: 250/1179 (21.20%)
Bases loaded: 259/1014 (25.54%)
Runner at second: 737/3382 (21.79%)
Runners at second and third: 228/911 (25.03%)
Runner at third: 318/1343 (23.68%)


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***********************************************************************************************

     On Sunday, Ju1 01, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

***********************************************************************************************

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0116.  Orthopedic Surgery

I’m starting to really feel the elbow going in.

I finally understood what you meant when you say “arm wrestle it in”

It’s a good cue to get the elbow up and in on the acromial line.

Also, when I throw or snap lids, do you want me to start with my forearm and hand fully supinated so I can get more rotation of my forearm and hand when I pronation snap?

Will this also help me put more spin on the curveball?

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     Pitchers must never supinate forearms.

01. When you throw Maxline True Screwballs, you leave the palm of the hand facing away and rotate the upper arm inwardly.

02. When you throw Torque Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces away from the glove side.

03. When you throw Maxline Fastballs, you turn the palm of the hand faces toward the pitching hand.

04. When your throw Maxline Pronation Curves, you turn the palm of the hand faces down.


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0117.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 6/30-7/6/2018

SAT (6/30)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 293.66
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.94
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.20
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.88

SUN (7/1)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.54
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.67
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 26.00

MON (7/2)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 299.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.03
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.70
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 19.40

TUE (7/3)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 310.07
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.61
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.67
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 32.00

WED (7/4)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 281.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.03
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.07
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.18

THU (7/5)--8 games
Average number of pitches per game: 288.25
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.59
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 16.67

FRI (7/6)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 299.47
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.28
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.13
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 25.20

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 6/30-7/6/2018

No out: 480
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None on: 364
Runner at first: 65
Runners at first and second: 15
Runners at first and third: 6
Bases loaded: 5
Runner at second: 18
Runners at second and third: 6
Runner at third: 1

One out: 520
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None on: 301
Runner at first: 92
Runners at first and second: 35
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 17
Runner at second: 47
Runners at second and third: 6
Runner at third: 14

Two outs: 519
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None on: 244
Runner at first: 88
Runners at first and second: 49
Runners at first and third: 17
Bases loaded: 23
Runner at second: 62
Runners at second and third: 13
Runner at third: 23

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 7356/34630 (21.24%)
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None on: 5429/24755 (21.93%)
Runner at first: 1028/5383 (19.10%)
Runners at first and second: 277/1374 (20.16%)
Runners at first and third: 96/471 (20.38%)
Bases loaded: 78/379 (20.58%)
Runner at second: 323/1669 (19.35)
Runners at second and third: 75/351 (21.37%)
Runner at third: 50/248 (20.16%)

One out: 7351/33296 (22.08%)
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None on: 4259/18095 (23.54%)
Runner at first: 1299/6526 (19.90%)
Runners at first and second: 494/2304 (21.44%)
Runners at first and third: 179/1041 (17.20%)
Bases loaded: 186/875 (21.26%)
Runner at second: 588/2653 (22.16%)
Runners at second and third: 171/832 (20.55%)
Runner at third: 175/970 (18.04%)

Two outs: 7638/32300 (23.65%)
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None on: 3617/14456 (25.02%)
Runner at first: 1387/6439 (21.54%)
Runners at first and second: 704/2998 (23.48%)
Runners at first and third: 267/1253 (21.31%)
Bases loaded: 282/1102 (25.59%)
Runner at second: 799/3635 (21.98%)
Runners at second and third: 241/973 (24.77%)
Runner at third: 341/1444 (23.61%)


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     On Sunday, Ju1 08, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0118.  Orthopedic Surgery

I’ve been trying to get this horizontal rebound.

I haven’t quite gotten it yet.

It’s almost like I have to throw the Inside of my elbow to hit my face to even come close to showing the back of my elbow towards home plate.

How do I get better at throwing my elbow in to give me that release velocity increase?

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     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement through second base.

     The Pectoralis Major raises the upper arm horizontally.

     Then, the Latissimus Dorsi (I) raises the upper arm vertically.

     With the upper arm horizontally with the forearm behind, you throw the upper arm inside and stretch the elastic tendon.

     When you use the Lid for the 'pronation snap,' you stretch the tendon of the Latissimus Dorsi (I).


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0119.  Please send this to the National Federation of High Schools

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2018-19 Baseball Rules Changes Focus on Pitching

The National Federation of High Schools has changed their rule that pitchers must have their entire pitching foot in contact with the rubber.

“The elimination of the requirement for the entire pivot foot to be in contact with the pitcher’s plate is among the changes approved for the 2018-19 high school baseball season.”

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     For pitchers have to the entire pivot foot, pitchers have to use the Tensor Fasciae Latae muscle.

     Pitchers have to point their landing foot forward.

     With pitchers locking the pivot foot to the pitchers’ plate and the landing foot pointing forward, the pitchers will injure their entire pivot knee.

     To not injure their pivot knee, pitchers have to point their entire pivot foot forward.

     The Tibialis Anterior muscle moves the pivot foot to the pitchers’ plate.


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0120.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 7/7-13/2018

SAT (7/7)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 311.33
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.43
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.47
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 24.74

SUN (7/8)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 314.00
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.76
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.33
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.91

MON (7/9)--13 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.15
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.15
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.38
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 27.71

TUE (7/10)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.63
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.00
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 33.33

WED (7/11)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 314.13
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.95
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.87
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 31.07

THU (7/12)--10 games
Average number of pitches per game: 296.80
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.96
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5 1/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.80
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 16.18

FRI (7/13)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 298.60
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.03
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 5
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.13
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 21.50

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 7/7-13/2018

No out: 554
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None on: 411
Runner at first: 63
Runners at first and second: 30
Runners at first and third: 5
Bases loaded: 7
Runner at second: 25
Runners at second and third: 7
Runner at third: 6

One out: 563
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None on: 304
Runner at first: 96
Runners at first and second: 48
Runners at first and third: 15
Bases loaded: 15
Runner at second: 51
Runners at second and third: 17
Runner at third: 17

Two outs: 552
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None on: 235
Runner at first: 105
Runners at first and second: 63
Runners at first and third: 21
Bases loaded: 22
Runner at second: 64
Runners at second and third: 23
Runner at third: 19

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 7910/37274 (21.22%)
------------
None on: 5840/26577 (21.97%)
Runner at first: 1091/5804 (18.80%)
Runners at first and second: 307/1501 (20.45%)
Runners at first and third: 101/509 (19.84%)
Bases loaded: 85/403 (21.09%)
Runner at second: 348/1815 (19.17%)
Runners at second and third: 82/389 (21.08%)
Runner at third: 56/276 (20.29%)

One out: 7914/35769 (22.13%)
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None on: 4563/19391 (23.53%)
Runner at first: 1395/7000 (19.93%)
Runners at first and second: 542/2507 (21.62%)
Runners at first and third: 194/1124 (17.26%)
Bases loaded: 201/944 (21.29%)
Runner at second: 639/2866 (22.30%)
Runners at second and third: 188/896 (20.98%)
Runner at third: 192/1041 (18.44%)

Two outs: 8190/34762 (23.56%)
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None on: 3852/15511 (24.83%)
Runner at first: 1492/6939 (21.50%)
Runners at first and second: 767/3233 (23.72%)
Runners at first and third: 288/1354 (21.27%)
Bases loaded: 304/1201 (25.31%)
Runner at second: 863/3910 (22.07%)
Runners at second and third: 264/1069 (24.70%)
Runner at third: 360/1545 (23.30%)


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     On Sunday, Ju1 15, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0121.  Brad Sullivan's Ugly numbers/Strikeout breakdown 7/14-20/2018

SAT (7/14)--16 games
Average number of pitches per game: 294.38
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.53
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 6.81
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.18

SUN (7/15)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 289.27
Average number of pitches per half inning: 16.37
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly over 4 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.60
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 20.18

FRI (7/20)--15 games
Average number of pitches per game: 321.13
Average number of pitches per half inning: 17.64
Average number of innings per starter: Slightly under 5 2/3
Average number of relievers per game (both teams): 7.80
Percentage of relievers pitching more than one inning: 17.09

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 7/14-20/2018

No out: 263
--------------
None on: 202
Runner at first: 32
Runners at first and second: 9
Runners at first and third: 1
Bases loaded: 7
Runner at second: 11
Runners at second and third: 1
Runner at third: 0

One out: 276
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None on: 165
Runner at first: 46
Runners at first and second: 17
Runners at first and third: 8
Bases loaded: 9
Runner at second: 22
Runners at second and third: 7
Runner at third: 2

Two outs: 252
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None on: 106
Runner at first: 52
Runners at first and second: 23
Runners at first and third: 16
Bases loaded: 13
Runner at second: 21
Runners at second and third: 3
Runner at third: 18

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Brad Sullivan's Strikeouts for 2018

No outs: 8173/38554 (21.20%)
------------
None on: 6042/27478 (21.99%)
Runner at first: 1123/6009 (18.69%)
Runners at first and second: 316/1558 (20.28%)
Runners at first and third: 102/522 (19.54%)
Bases loaded: 92/424 (21.70%)
Runner at second: 359/1883 (19.07%)
Runners at second and third: 83/395 (21.01%)
Runner at third: 56/285 (19.65%)

One out: 8190/37015 (22.13%)
------------
None on: 4728/20045 (23.59%)
Runner at first: 1441/7228 (19.94%)
Runners at first and second: 559/2596 (21.53%)
Runners at first and third: 202/1169 (17.28%)
Bases loaded: 210/989 (21.23%)
Runner at second: 661/2980 (22.18%)
Runners at second and third: 195/934 (20.88%)
Runner at third: 194/1074 (18.06%)

Two outs: 8442/35943 (23.49%)
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None on: 3958/16023 (24.70%)
Runner at first: 1544/7178 (21.51%)
Runners at first and second: 790/3328 (23.74%)
Runners at first and third: 304/1413 (21.51%)
Bases loaded: 317/1258 (25.20%)
Runner at second: 884/4042 (21.87%)
Runners at second and third: 267/1095 (24.38%)
Runner at third: 378/1606 (23.54%)


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     On Sunday, Ju1 22, 2018, I posted the following questions and answers.

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0122. 

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0123. 

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0124. 

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0125. 

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0126. 

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0127. 

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0128. 

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0129. 

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0130. 

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     Good information for all baseball pitchers.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Marshall Pitching Motion.

01. One disk pops-up.

     You can use Google and write: YouTube in Dr. Mike Marshall's Research Begins

02. Four disks pop-up.

  a. James Jeffrey Sparks.
  b. Biomechanical Flaws.
  c. Injurious Flaws.
  d. Research Begins.

     Pitchers must pendulum swing their pitching arm downward, backward and upward to driveline height in one, smooth and continuous movement through second base followed with the Pronator Teres muscle contracting before, during and after the acceleration phase.

     To prevent elbow injuries, pitchers must pronate the releases of all types of pitches, especially curveballs and/or sliders.

     To prevent pitching injuries, pitchers of all ages must to master the Marshall Pitching Motion.

  
Happy pitching.



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